Younger people with Type 2 diabetes have poorer self-care practices compared with older people

results from the Australian National Diabetes Audit

N. Nanayakkara, A. J. Pease, S. Ranasinha, N. Wischer, S. Andrikopoulos, B. de Courten, S. Zoungas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Aim: This cross-sectional study compares the self-care practices of younger and older people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Data were analysed from the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) including 2552 adults with Type 2 diabetes from Australian Diabetes Centres. Pre-specified demographic and clinical variables were obtained. Self-care variables (physical activity, following dietary recommendations, medication adherence and monitoring blood glucose levels) were compared in people ≤ 64 and > 64 years of age. Results: Mean age (± sd) of participants was 63 ± 13 years overall, 53 ± 9 years for the younger group and 73 ± 6 years for the older group. A greater proportion of younger people had HbA1c levels > 53 mmol/mol (> 7.0%) (76% vs. 68%), reported difficulty following dietary recommendations (50% vs. 32%) and forgetting medications (37% vs. 22%) compared with older people (all P-values <0.001). A smaller proportion of younger compared with older people reported monitoring their blood glucose levels as often as recommended (60% vs. 70%, P < 0.001). Similar proportions of people aged ≤ 64 and > 64 years required insulin therapy (59% vs. 57%, P = 0.200). Younger age was associated with a twofold increase in the odds of not following the recommended self-care practices after adjustment for gender, smoking, insulin therapy, depression and allied health attendance (all P < 0.001). Conclusions: Despite shorter diabetes duration, younger age was associated with worse glycaemic control and poorer diabetes self-care practices among people with Type 2 diabetes. Targeted strategies are required to optimize diabetes self-care practices and thereby glycaemic control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1087-1095
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume35
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Cite this

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title = "Younger people with Type 2 diabetes have poorer self-care practices compared with older people: results from the Australian National Diabetes Audit",
abstract = "Aim: This cross-sectional study compares the self-care practices of younger and older people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Data were analysed from the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) including 2552 adults with Type 2 diabetes from Australian Diabetes Centres. Pre-specified demographic and clinical variables were obtained. Self-care variables (physical activity, following dietary recommendations, medication adherence and monitoring blood glucose levels) were compared in people ≤ 64 and > 64 years of age. Results: Mean age (± sd) of participants was 63 ± 13 years overall, 53 ± 9 years for the younger group and 73 ± 6 years for the older group. A greater proportion of younger people had HbA1c levels > 53 mmol/mol (> 7.0{\%}) (76{\%} vs. 68{\%}), reported difficulty following dietary recommendations (50{\%} vs. 32{\%}) and forgetting medications (37{\%} vs. 22{\%}) compared with older people (all P-values <0.001). A smaller proportion of younger compared with older people reported monitoring their blood glucose levels as often as recommended (60{\%} vs. 70{\%}, P < 0.001). Similar proportions of people aged ≤ 64 and > 64 years required insulin therapy (59{\%} vs. 57{\%}, P = 0.200). Younger age was associated with a twofold increase in the odds of not following the recommended self-care practices after adjustment for gender, smoking, insulin therapy, depression and allied health attendance (all P < 0.001). Conclusions: Despite shorter diabetes duration, younger age was associated with worse glycaemic control and poorer diabetes self-care practices among people with Type 2 diabetes. Targeted strategies are required to optimize diabetes self-care practices and thereby glycaemic control.",
author = "N. Nanayakkara and Pease, {A. J.} and S. Ranasinha and N. Wischer and S. Andrikopoulos and {de Courten}, B. and S. Zoungas",
year = "2018",
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Younger people with Type 2 diabetes have poorer self-care practices compared with older people : results from the Australian National Diabetes Audit. / Nanayakkara, N.; Pease, A. J.; Ranasinha, S.; Wischer, N.; Andrikopoulos, S.; de Courten, B.; Zoungas, S.

In: Diabetic Medicine, Vol. 35, No. 8, 01.08.2018, p. 1087-1095.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Younger people with Type 2 diabetes have poorer self-care practices compared with older people

T2 - results from the Australian National Diabetes Audit

AU - Nanayakkara, N.

AU - Pease, A. J.

AU - Ranasinha, S.

AU - Wischer, N.

AU - Andrikopoulos, S.

AU - de Courten, B.

AU - Zoungas, S.

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Aim: This cross-sectional study compares the self-care practices of younger and older people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Data were analysed from the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) including 2552 adults with Type 2 diabetes from Australian Diabetes Centres. Pre-specified demographic and clinical variables were obtained. Self-care variables (physical activity, following dietary recommendations, medication adherence and monitoring blood glucose levels) were compared in people ≤ 64 and > 64 years of age. Results: Mean age (± sd) of participants was 63 ± 13 years overall, 53 ± 9 years for the younger group and 73 ± 6 years for the older group. A greater proportion of younger people had HbA1c levels > 53 mmol/mol (> 7.0%) (76% vs. 68%), reported difficulty following dietary recommendations (50% vs. 32%) and forgetting medications (37% vs. 22%) compared with older people (all P-values <0.001). A smaller proportion of younger compared with older people reported monitoring their blood glucose levels as often as recommended (60% vs. 70%, P < 0.001). Similar proportions of people aged ≤ 64 and > 64 years required insulin therapy (59% vs. 57%, P = 0.200). Younger age was associated with a twofold increase in the odds of not following the recommended self-care practices after adjustment for gender, smoking, insulin therapy, depression and allied health attendance (all P < 0.001). Conclusions: Despite shorter diabetes duration, younger age was associated with worse glycaemic control and poorer diabetes self-care practices among people with Type 2 diabetes. Targeted strategies are required to optimize diabetes self-care practices and thereby glycaemic control.

AB - Aim: This cross-sectional study compares the self-care practices of younger and older people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Data were analysed from the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA) including 2552 adults with Type 2 diabetes from Australian Diabetes Centres. Pre-specified demographic and clinical variables were obtained. Self-care variables (physical activity, following dietary recommendations, medication adherence and monitoring blood glucose levels) were compared in people ≤ 64 and > 64 years of age. Results: Mean age (± sd) of participants was 63 ± 13 years overall, 53 ± 9 years for the younger group and 73 ± 6 years for the older group. A greater proportion of younger people had HbA1c levels > 53 mmol/mol (> 7.0%) (76% vs. 68%), reported difficulty following dietary recommendations (50% vs. 32%) and forgetting medications (37% vs. 22%) compared with older people (all P-values <0.001). A smaller proportion of younger compared with older people reported monitoring their blood glucose levels as often as recommended (60% vs. 70%, P < 0.001). Similar proportions of people aged ≤ 64 and > 64 years required insulin therapy (59% vs. 57%, P = 0.200). Younger age was associated with a twofold increase in the odds of not following the recommended self-care practices after adjustment for gender, smoking, insulin therapy, depression and allied health attendance (all P < 0.001). Conclusions: Despite shorter diabetes duration, younger age was associated with worse glycaemic control and poorer diabetes self-care practices among people with Type 2 diabetes. Targeted strategies are required to optimize diabetes self-care practices and thereby glycaemic control.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050117444&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/dme.13660

DO - 10.1111/dme.13660

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 1087

EP - 1095

JO - Diabetic Medicine

JF - Diabetic Medicine

SN - 0742-3071

IS - 8

ER -