Young people transitioning from out-of-home care in Victoria, Australia: Strengthening support services for dual clients of Child Protection and Youth Justice

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A significant proportion of young people leaving out-of-home care (OHC) experience involvement with the Youth Justice system, exposing them to further risks and reducing their likelihood of full social and economic engagement in mainstream society. However, little is known about the experiences of this dual order client group as they transition from care. This chapter reviews the findings of a research project based on a partnership between Monash University and seven non-government child and youth welfare agencies in Victoria, Australia, and identifies practices and policies that could reduce the over-representation of young people leaving OHC via the Youth Justice system. The findings suggest the utility of incorporating a trauma-informed approach to preventing and addressing offending behaviour in young people in, and leaving, OHC.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationYoung People Transitioning from Out-of-Home Care: International Research, Policy and Practice
EditorsPhilip Mendes, Pamela Snow
Place of PublicationLondon UK
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages23-44
Number of pages22
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781137556394
ISBN (Print)9781137556387
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

Cite this

Mendes, P., Snow, P. C., & Baidawi, S. (2016). Young people transitioning from out-of-home care in Victoria, Australia: Strengthening support services for dual clients of Child Protection and Youth Justice. In P. Mendes, & P. Snow (Eds.), Young People Transitioning from Out-of-Home Care: International Research, Policy and Practice (1 ed., pp. 23-44). London UK: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-55639-4_2