Workplace responses and psychologists’ needs following client suicide

Melissa Finlayson, Janette Simmonds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This research aimed to explore the role of workplace responses in psychologists’ adaptation to client suicides. Participants were 178 psychologists who completed an online self-report questionnaire which included both open and closed questions yielding qualitative and quantitative data. Fifty-six (31.5%) participants reported one or more client suicides. Mixed results were found in terms of perceived support from the workplace following a client suicide. Psychologists reported a need for more open communication in the workplace, peer supports, space to grieve, as well as opportunities to engage in a learning process. The findings have important implications for research and for understanding the role of the workplace postvention. It also raises the need for external support to be accessible for psychologists working in private practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-33
Number of pages16
JournalOmega: Journal of Death and Dying
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2019

Keywords

  • bereavement
  • client suicide
  • postvention
  • psychologists
  • workplace

Cite this

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Workplace responses and psychologists’ needs following client suicide. / Finlayson, Melissa; Simmonds, Janette.

In: Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, Vol. 79, No. 1, 05.2019, p. 18-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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