Work–family conflict among Australian dual-earner couples

testing the effects of role salience crossover and gender

Lakmal Abeysekera, Peter Gahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing on identity theory, this study examined the extent to which the salience (i.e. importance) individuals in dual-earner couples attached to their respective work and family roles determined their partner’s experience of work-to-family (W-F) and family-to-work (F-W) conflict through crossover effects. Using matched surveys, data were collected from a sample of 94 Australian dual-earner couples. Consistent with our predictions, results supported couple-level crossover effects of role salience to influence each partner’s experience of W-F and F-W conflicts. In addition, the impact of crossover effects on W-F and F-W conflicts was found to be more pronounced for women than men. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1549-1582
Number of pages34
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Australia
  • dual-earner couples
  • gender
  • identity theory
  • role salience crossover
  • Work–family conflict

Cite this

@article{c25b776061fe48849149635270b62047,
title = "Work–family conflict among Australian dual-earner couples: testing the effects of role salience crossover and gender",
abstract = "Drawing on identity theory, this study examined the extent to which the salience (i.e. importance) individuals in dual-earner couples attached to their respective work and family roles determined their partner’s experience of work-to-family (W-F) and family-to-work (F-W) conflict through crossover effects. Using matched surveys, data were collected from a sample of 94 Australian dual-earner couples. Consistent with our predictions, results supported couple-level crossover effects of role salience to influence each partner’s experience of W-F and F-W conflicts. In addition, the impact of crossover effects on W-F and F-W conflicts was found to be more pronounced for women than men. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.",
keywords = "Australia, dual-earner couples, gender, identity theory, role salience crossover, Work–family conflict",
author = "Lakmal Abeysekera and Peter Gahan",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/09585192.2017.1296015",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "1549--1582",
journal = "The International Journal of Human Resource Management",
issn = "0958-5192",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "10",

}

Work–family conflict among Australian dual-earner couples : testing the effects of role salience crossover and gender. / Abeysekera, Lakmal; Gahan, Peter.

In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 30, No. 10, 2019, p. 1549-1582.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Work–family conflict among Australian dual-earner couples

T2 - testing the effects of role salience crossover and gender

AU - Abeysekera, Lakmal

AU - Gahan, Peter

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Drawing on identity theory, this study examined the extent to which the salience (i.e. importance) individuals in dual-earner couples attached to their respective work and family roles determined their partner’s experience of work-to-family (W-F) and family-to-work (F-W) conflict through crossover effects. Using matched surveys, data were collected from a sample of 94 Australian dual-earner couples. Consistent with our predictions, results supported couple-level crossover effects of role salience to influence each partner’s experience of W-F and F-W conflicts. In addition, the impact of crossover effects on W-F and F-W conflicts was found to be more pronounced for women than men. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

AB - Drawing on identity theory, this study examined the extent to which the salience (i.e. importance) individuals in dual-earner couples attached to their respective work and family roles determined their partner’s experience of work-to-family (W-F) and family-to-work (F-W) conflict through crossover effects. Using matched surveys, data were collected from a sample of 94 Australian dual-earner couples. Consistent with our predictions, results supported couple-level crossover effects of role salience to influence each partner’s experience of W-F and F-W conflicts. In addition, the impact of crossover effects on W-F and F-W conflicts was found to be more pronounced for women than men. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

KW - Australia

KW - dual-earner couples

KW - gender

KW - identity theory

KW - role salience crossover

KW - Work–family conflict

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85013816273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09585192.2017.1296015

DO - 10.1080/09585192.2017.1296015

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 1549

EP - 1582

JO - The International Journal of Human Resource Management

JF - The International Journal of Human Resource Management

SN - 0958-5192

IS - 10

ER -