Women in management in China

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

Abstract

Despite the promotion of Chairman Mao’s famous motto: ‘women hold up half of the sky’ as an egalitarian socialist ideology since the 1950s, and despite their high level of labor market participation, there remains a low proportion of women in political leadership and managerial positions in China. More precisely, in 2013 women made up just over 23.4 percent of all representatives to the National People’s Congress of China (the highest state body and the only legislative house in the country) (NBSC, 2014). By 2007, only 17 percent of those in local government leadership positions were women (Nie, 2009). Only 1.2 percent of women worked as heads of organizations in 2013, compared with 3.1 percent of men who did so (NBSC, 2014). Only 2.6 percent of women were employers compared to 5.2 percent of men in the same category in 2013 (NBSC, 2014). This chapter analyzes the political, social, cultural and organizational barriers to women’s advancement in their managerial careers against a context of high levels of education and labor market participation of women close to that of men.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWomen in Management Worldwide
Subtitle of host publicationSigns of Progress
EditorsRonald J. Burke , Astrid M. Richardsen
Place of PublicationAbingdon UK
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter13
Pages195-210
Number of pages16
Edition3rd
ISBN (Electronic)9781134775484
ISBN (Print)9781472462718
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Cite this

Cooke, F. L. (2017). Women in management in China. In R. J. Burke , & A. M. Richardsen (Eds.), Women in Management Worldwide: Signs of Progress (3rd ed., pp. 195-210). Abingdon UK: Taylor & Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315546742-25
Cooke, Fang Lee. / Women in management in China. Women in Management Worldwide: Signs of Progress. editor / Ronald J. Burke ; Astrid M. Richardsen. 3rd. ed. Abingdon UK : Taylor & Francis, 2017. pp. 195-210
@inbook{29360b3cc0bb43c9b02b17d754b7dac8,
title = "Women in management in China",
abstract = "Despite the promotion of Chairman Mao’s famous motto: ‘women hold up half of the sky’ as an egalitarian socialist ideology since the 1950s, and despite their high level of labor market participation, there remains a low proportion of women in political leadership and managerial positions in China. More precisely, in 2013 women made up just over 23.4 percent of all representatives to the National People’s Congress of China (the highest state body and the only legislative house in the country) (NBSC, 2014). By 2007, only 17 percent of those in local government leadership positions were women (Nie, 2009). Only 1.2 percent of women worked as heads of organizations in 2013, compared with 3.1 percent of men who did so (NBSC, 2014). Only 2.6 percent of women were employers compared to 5.2 percent of men in the same category in 2013 (NBSC, 2014). This chapter analyzes the political, social, cultural and organizational barriers to women’s advancement in their managerial careers against a context of high levels of education and labor market participation of women close to that of men.",
author = "Cooke, {Fang Lee}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.4324/9781315546742-25",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781472462718",
pages = "195--210",
editor = "{Burke }, {Ronald J. } and Richardsen, {Astrid M. }",
booktitle = "Women in Management Worldwide",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
address = "United Kingdom",
edition = "3rd",

}

Cooke, FL 2017, Women in management in China. in RJ Burke & AM Richardsen (eds), Women in Management Worldwide: Signs of Progress. 3rd edn, Taylor & Francis, Abingdon UK, pp. 195-210. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315546742-25

Women in management in China. / Cooke, Fang Lee.

Women in Management Worldwide: Signs of Progress. ed. / Ronald J. Burke ; Astrid M. Richardsen. 3rd. ed. Abingdon UK : Taylor & Francis, 2017. p. 195-210.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Women in management in China

AU - Cooke, Fang Lee

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Despite the promotion of Chairman Mao’s famous motto: ‘women hold up half of the sky’ as an egalitarian socialist ideology since the 1950s, and despite their high level of labor market participation, there remains a low proportion of women in political leadership and managerial positions in China. More precisely, in 2013 women made up just over 23.4 percent of all representatives to the National People’s Congress of China (the highest state body and the only legislative house in the country) (NBSC, 2014). By 2007, only 17 percent of those in local government leadership positions were women (Nie, 2009). Only 1.2 percent of women worked as heads of organizations in 2013, compared with 3.1 percent of men who did so (NBSC, 2014). Only 2.6 percent of women were employers compared to 5.2 percent of men in the same category in 2013 (NBSC, 2014). This chapter analyzes the political, social, cultural and organizational barriers to women’s advancement in their managerial careers against a context of high levels of education and labor market participation of women close to that of men.

AB - Despite the promotion of Chairman Mao’s famous motto: ‘women hold up half of the sky’ as an egalitarian socialist ideology since the 1950s, and despite their high level of labor market participation, there remains a low proportion of women in political leadership and managerial positions in China. More precisely, in 2013 women made up just over 23.4 percent of all representatives to the National People’s Congress of China (the highest state body and the only legislative house in the country) (NBSC, 2014). By 2007, only 17 percent of those in local government leadership positions were women (Nie, 2009). Only 1.2 percent of women worked as heads of organizations in 2013, compared with 3.1 percent of men who did so (NBSC, 2014). Only 2.6 percent of women were employers compared to 5.2 percent of men in the same category in 2013 (NBSC, 2014). This chapter analyzes the political, social, cultural and organizational barriers to women’s advancement in their managerial careers against a context of high levels of education and labor market participation of women close to that of men.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85024861614&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4324/9781315546742-25

DO - 10.4324/9781315546742-25

M3 - Chapter (Book)

SN - 9781472462718

SP - 195

EP - 210

BT - Women in Management Worldwide

A2 - Burke , Ronald J.

A2 - Richardsen, Astrid M.

PB - Taylor & Francis

CY - Abingdon UK

ER -

Cooke FL. Women in management in China. In Burke RJ, Richardsen AM, editors, Women in Management Worldwide: Signs of Progress. 3rd ed. Abingdon UK: Taylor & Francis. 2017. p. 195-210 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315546742-25