Wolves in sheep's clothing: Is non-profit status used to signal quality?

Daniel B Jones, Carol Propper, Sarah Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Why do many firms in the healthcare sector adopt non-profit status? One argument is that non-profit status serves as a signal of quality when consumers are not well informed. A testable implication is that an increase in consumer information may lead to a reduction in the number of non-profits in a market. We test this idea empirically by exploiting an exogenous increase in consumer information in the US nursing home industry. We find that the information shock led to a reduction in the share of non-profit homes, driven by a combination of home closure and sector switching. The lowest quality non-profits were the most likely to exit. Our results have important implications for the effects of reforms to increase consumer provision in a number of public services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-120
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Economics
Volume55
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Non-profit
  • Nursing homes
  • Quality disclosure

Cite this

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Wolves in sheep's clothing : Is non-profit status used to signal quality? / Jones, Daniel B; Propper, Carol; Smith, Sarah.

In: Journal of Health Economics, Vol. 55, 09.2017, p. 108-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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