Why stronger ties with China are in our best interests

Joseph Martin Cheer

Research output: Other contributionOtherpeer-review

Abstract

If the narrative in Chinese media is anything to go by, there is growing angst concerning Australia’s diplomatic language towards China and why confrontation and suspicion rather than cooperation seems to have intensified.

China is lauded as Australia’s key trade relationship, and the country’s economic stability is heavily tied to it.

It was once thought that when the United States sneezed, Australia would catch a cold. Now it seems that a sneezing China would have Australia contracting pneumonia.
Original languageEnglish
TypeOn the Australia-China Bilateral relationship
Media of outputAustralia China Business Review
PublisherAustralia China Business Review
Number of pages1
Place of PublicationPerth
Publication statusPublished - 8 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Australia-China relations
  • Tourism
  • China
  • Australia

Cite this

Cheer, J. M. (2018, Mar 8). Why stronger ties with China are in our best interests. Perth: Australia China Business Review.
Cheer, Joseph Martin. / Why stronger ties with China are in our best interests. 2018. Perth : Australia China Business Review. 1 p.
@misc{22233e9b52b54dac8f65a3039157377a,
title = "Why stronger ties with China are in our best interests",
abstract = "If the narrative in Chinese media is anything to go by, there is growing angst concerning Australia’s diplomatic language towards China and why confrontation and suspicion rather than cooperation seems to have intensified.China is lauded as Australia’s key trade relationship, and the country’s economic stability is heavily tied to it.It was once thought that when the United States sneezed, Australia would catch a cold. Now it seems that a sneezing China would have Australia contracting pneumonia.",
keywords = "Australia-China relations, Tourism, China, Australia",
author = "Cheer, {Joseph Martin}",
note = "Dr Joseph M. Cheer was the recipient of a grant through the Australia-China Council and the Australian government in 2017-18. With this, Monash University hosted the symposium Beyond the City: Dispersing Chinese Visitors into Regional Australia on February 12, 2018. The aim was to investigate how Chinese inbound tourism could make a larger contribution to sustainable and resilient economic development in regional Australia",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "8",
language = "English",
publisher = "Australia China Business Review",
type = "Other",

}

Cheer, JM 2018, Why stronger ties with China are in our best interests. Australia China Business Review, Perth.

Why stronger ties with China are in our best interests. / Cheer, Joseph Martin.

1 p. Perth : Australia China Business Review. 2018, On the Australia-China Bilateral relationship.

Research output: Other contributionOtherpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - Why stronger ties with China are in our best interests

AU - Cheer, Joseph Martin

N1 - Dr Joseph M. Cheer was the recipient of a grant through the Australia-China Council and the Australian government in 2017-18. With this, Monash University hosted the symposium Beyond the City: Dispersing Chinese Visitors into Regional Australia on February 12, 2018. The aim was to investigate how Chinese inbound tourism could make a larger contribution to sustainable and resilient economic development in regional Australia

PY - 2018/3/8

Y1 - 2018/3/8

N2 - If the narrative in Chinese media is anything to go by, there is growing angst concerning Australia’s diplomatic language towards China and why confrontation and suspicion rather than cooperation seems to have intensified.China is lauded as Australia’s key trade relationship, and the country’s economic stability is heavily tied to it.It was once thought that when the United States sneezed, Australia would catch a cold. Now it seems that a sneezing China would have Australia contracting pneumonia.

AB - If the narrative in Chinese media is anything to go by, there is growing angst concerning Australia’s diplomatic language towards China and why confrontation and suspicion rather than cooperation seems to have intensified.China is lauded as Australia’s key trade relationship, and the country’s economic stability is heavily tied to it.It was once thought that when the United States sneezed, Australia would catch a cold. Now it seems that a sneezing China would have Australia contracting pneumonia.

KW - Australia-China relations

KW - Tourism

KW - China

KW - Australia

M3 - Other contribution

PB - Australia China Business Review

CY - Perth

ER -