Why don't Aboriginal men seek help for mental health problems?

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOtherOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Aboriginal men do not access mainstream mental health services in proportion to their need and very little is known about Aboriginal men’s help seeking for mental health problems. This study explored the help seeking behaviour of rural Aboriginal men with mental health problems. The study was carried out using a combination of culturally appropriate research methodologies. A total of seventeen Aboriginal people were interviewed of whom fifteen were men. Data were analysed thematically. Four themes emerged from the data collected. They included difficulty in recognising the problem, barriers to disclosing one’s illness, reluctance to contact services and alternate coping strategies. This study is the first in-depth exploration of the help seeking behaviour of Australian Aboriginal men with mental health problems. It implies that improving utilisation of mental health services by Aboriginal men might need to not only focus on making services culturally sensitive but also address the barriers to their help seeking.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventAustralian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium - Hotel Grand Chancellor on Hindley, Adealide SA, Australia
Duration: 19 Nov 201221 Nov 2012
Conference number: 4th

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium
CountryAustralia
CityAdealide SA
Period19/11/1221/11/12

Cite this

Isaacs, A. N. (2012). Why don't Aboriginal men seek help for mental health problems?. Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia.
Isaacs, Anton Neville. / Why don't Aboriginal men seek help for mental health problems?. Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia.
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title = "Why don't Aboriginal men seek help for mental health problems?",
abstract = "Aboriginal men do not access mainstream mental health services in proportion to their need and very little is known about Aboriginal men’s help seeking for mental health problems. This study explored the help seeking behaviour of rural Aboriginal men with mental health problems. The study was carried out using a combination of culturally appropriate research methodologies. A total of seventeen Aboriginal people were interviewed of whom fifteen were men. Data were analysed thematically. Four themes emerged from the data collected. They included difficulty in recognising the problem, barriers to disclosing one’s illness, reluctance to contact services and alternate coping strategies. This study is the first in-depth exploration of the help seeking behaviour of Australian Aboriginal men with mental health problems. It implies that improving utilisation of mental health services by Aboriginal men might need to not only focus on making services culturally sensitive but also address the barriers to their help seeking.",
author = "Isaacs, {Anton Neville}",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
note = "Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium ; Conference date: 19-11-2012 Through 21-11-2012",

}

Isaacs, AN 2012, 'Why don't Aboriginal men seek help for mental health problems?' Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia, 19/11/12 - 21/11/12, .

Why don't Aboriginal men seek help for mental health problems? / Isaacs, Anton Neville.

2012. Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOtherOtherpeer-review

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T1 - Why don't Aboriginal men seek help for mental health problems?

AU - Isaacs, Anton Neville

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Aboriginal men do not access mainstream mental health services in proportion to their need and very little is known about Aboriginal men’s help seeking for mental health problems. This study explored the help seeking behaviour of rural Aboriginal men with mental health problems. The study was carried out using a combination of culturally appropriate research methodologies. A total of seventeen Aboriginal people were interviewed of whom fifteen were men. Data were analysed thematically. Four themes emerged from the data collected. They included difficulty in recognising the problem, barriers to disclosing one’s illness, reluctance to contact services and alternate coping strategies. This study is the first in-depth exploration of the help seeking behaviour of Australian Aboriginal men with mental health problems. It implies that improving utilisation of mental health services by Aboriginal men might need to not only focus on making services culturally sensitive but also address the barriers to their help seeking.

AB - Aboriginal men do not access mainstream mental health services in proportion to their need and very little is known about Aboriginal men’s help seeking for mental health problems. This study explored the help seeking behaviour of rural Aboriginal men with mental health problems. The study was carried out using a combination of culturally appropriate research methodologies. A total of seventeen Aboriginal people were interviewed of whom fifteen were men. Data were analysed thematically. Four themes emerged from the data collected. They included difficulty in recognising the problem, barriers to disclosing one’s illness, reluctance to contact services and alternate coping strategies. This study is the first in-depth exploration of the help seeking behaviour of Australian Aboriginal men with mental health problems. It implies that improving utilisation of mental health services by Aboriginal men might need to not only focus on making services culturally sensitive but also address the barriers to their help seeking.

M3 - Other

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Isaacs AN. Why don't Aboriginal men seek help for mental health problems?. 2012. Australian Rural and Remote Mental Health Symposium , Adealide SA, Australia.