When victims become culprits: The role of subordinates' neuroticism in the relationship between abusive supervision and workplace deviance

Patrick Raymund James M Garcia, Lu Wang, Vinh Lu, Kohyar Kiazad, Simon Lloyd David Restubog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing upon the General Aggression Model, we examined the role of subordinates neuroticism in strengthening the relationship between abusive supervision and workplace deviance. Results revealed that Time 1 abusive supervision was positively related to Time 2 personnel records of workplace deviance measured 18 months later. Further, subordinates neuroticism moderated this relationship. Specifically, there was a stronger positive relationship between abusive supervision and workplace deviance for employees with high as opposed to low levels of neuroticism. These findings highlight the need to account for the role of individual differences in influencing subordinates responses to supervisor hostility. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225 - 229
Number of pages5
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume72
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

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abstract = "Drawing upon the General Aggression Model, we examined the role of subordinates neuroticism in strengthening the relationship between abusive supervision and workplace deviance. Results revealed that Time 1 abusive supervision was positively related to Time 2 personnel records of workplace deviance measured 18 months later. Further, subordinates neuroticism moderated this relationship. Specifically, there was a stronger positive relationship between abusive supervision and workplace deviance for employees with high as opposed to low levels of neuroticism. These findings highlight the need to account for the role of individual differences in influencing subordinates responses to supervisor hostility. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.",
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When victims become culprits: The role of subordinates' neuroticism in the relationship between abusive supervision and workplace deviance. / Garcia, Patrick Raymund James M; Wang, Lu; Lu, Vinh; Kiazad, Kohyar; Restubog, Simon Lloyd David.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 72, 2015, p. 225 - 229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Restubog, Simon Lloyd David

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