Video-based feedback on student assessment: scarily personal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Assessment feedback is an important part of students? learning experiences; however, textbased feedback has limitations. This article proposes an alternative in the form of individualised video recordings of the lecturer discussing each assignment. This research reports on 126 undergraduate and postgraduate students? reactions to 5-minute videos recorded by their teachers. The findings confirm that the majority of students valued the video feedback over text-based forms. In particular, video-based feedback was reported by students as being individualised (specific) and personalised (valorising identity and effort); supportive, caring and motivating; clear, detailed and unambiguous; prompting reflection; and constructive, which led to future strategising. Several potential weaknesses were also identified, including an initial anxiety about watching the videos, and the difficulty in matching the comments in the video-based feedback to the text-based assignment. Like the students, the teachers also reported that they valued the video feedback process, particularly in terms of being more time-efficient, facilitating quality especially in the form of feed forward comments, and rejuvenating teacher enthusiasm. The article concludes with implications for future research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51 - 66
Number of pages16
JournalAustralasian Journal of Educational Technology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

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title = "Video-based feedback on student assessment: scarily personal",
abstract = "Assessment feedback is an important part of students? learning experiences; however, textbased feedback has limitations. This article proposes an alternative in the form of individualised video recordings of the lecturer discussing each assignment. This research reports on 126 undergraduate and postgraduate students? reactions to 5-minute videos recorded by their teachers. The findings confirm that the majority of students valued the video feedback over text-based forms. In particular, video-based feedback was reported by students as being individualised (specific) and personalised (valorising identity and effort); supportive, caring and motivating; clear, detailed and unambiguous; prompting reflection; and constructive, which led to future strategising. Several potential weaknesses were also identified, including an initial anxiety about watching the videos, and the difficulty in matching the comments in the video-based feedback to the text-based assignment. Like the students, the teachers also reported that they valued the video feedback process, particularly in terms of being more time-efficient, facilitating quality especially in the form of feed forward comments, and rejuvenating teacher enthusiasm. The article concludes with implications for future research.",
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Video-based feedback on student assessment: scarily personal. / Henderson, Michael; Phillips, Michael David.

In: Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, Vol. 31, No. 1, 2015, p. 51 - 66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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