Victoria fire weather climatology dataset

Sarah Harris, Graham Mills, Timothy Brown, Domagoj Podnar, Hauss Reinbold, Matt Fearon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Weather and climate are essential elements in understanding the risk of bushfire and managing the landscape to reduce risks. Spatially and temporally homogenous climate data are essential for optimising planned burning and land management strategies, and scenario planning for major fire events. This paper summarises the development of a homogeneous 41-year (1972–2012) hourly 4-km gridded climate dataset for the fire-prone state of Victoria, Australia. This dataset has been generated using a combination of mesoscale modelling, global reanalysis data, surface observations, and historic observed rainfall analyses. Outputs include surface weather variables such as hourly temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction. The output data are created using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. Outputs provide an almost limitless opportunity for hitherto unavailable analyses – such as identifying the frequency of extremes and identifying trends over the 41-year period. Furthermore, the hourly mesoscale wind fields provide a homogeneous long-period data set with which to drive fire spread models such as Phoenix. This paper describes generation of the dataset, evaluation of the outputs and highlights its use and relevance for fire management.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationResearch Proceedings from the 2015 Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC & AFAC Conference
EditorsMichael Rumsewicz
Place of PublicationEast Melbourne Victoria Australia
PublisherBushfire and Natural Hazards CRC
Pages93-110
Number of pages18
ISBN (Print)9780994169655
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventBushfire and Natural Hazards Conference (CRC & AFAC 2015) - Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 1 Sep 20153 Sep 2015
https://www.bnhcrc.com.au/events/2015-annual-conf

Conference

ConferenceBushfire and Natural Hazards Conference (CRC & AFAC 2015)
Abbreviated titleCRC & AFAC 2015
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period1/09/153/09/15
Internet address

Cite this

Harris, S., Mills, G., Brown, T., Podnar, D., Reinbold, H., & Fearon, M. (2015). Victoria fire weather climatology dataset. In M. Rumsewicz (Ed.), Research Proceedings from the 2015 Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC & AFAC Conference (pp. 93-110). East Melbourne Victoria Australia: Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC.
Harris, Sarah ; Mills, Graham ; Brown, Timothy ; Podnar, Domagoj ; Reinbold, Hauss ; Fearon, Matt. / Victoria fire weather climatology dataset. Research Proceedings from the 2015 Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC & AFAC Conference. editor / Michael Rumsewicz. East Melbourne Victoria Australia : Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015. pp. 93-110
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title = "Victoria fire weather climatology dataset",
abstract = "Weather and climate are essential elements in understanding the risk of bushfire and managing the landscape to reduce risks. Spatially and temporally homogenous climate data are essential for optimising planned burning and land management strategies, and scenario planning for major fire events. This paper summarises the development of a homogeneous 41-year (1972–2012) hourly 4-km gridded climate dataset for the fire-prone state of Victoria, Australia. This dataset has been generated using a combination of mesoscale modelling, global reanalysis data, surface observations, and historic observed rainfall analyses. Outputs include surface weather variables such as hourly temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction. The output data are created using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. Outputs provide an almost limitless opportunity for hitherto unavailable analyses – such as identifying the frequency of extremes and identifying trends over the 41-year period. Furthermore, the hourly mesoscale wind fields provide a homogeneous long-period data set with which to drive fire spread models such as Phoenix. This paper describes generation of the dataset, evaluation of the outputs and highlights its use and relevance for fire management.",
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Harris, S, Mills, G, Brown, T, Podnar, D, Reinbold, H & Fearon, M 2015, Victoria fire weather climatology dataset. in M Rumsewicz (ed.), Research Proceedings from the 2015 Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC & AFAC Conference. Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, East Melbourne Victoria Australia, pp. 93-110, Bushfire and Natural Hazards Conference (CRC & AFAC 2015), Adelaide, Australia, 1/09/15.

Victoria fire weather climatology dataset. / Harris, Sarah; Mills, Graham; Brown, Timothy; Podnar, Domagoj; Reinbold, Hauss; Fearon, Matt.

Research Proceedings from the 2015 Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC & AFAC Conference. ed. / Michael Rumsewicz. East Melbourne Victoria Australia : Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015. p. 93-110.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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N2 - Weather and climate are essential elements in understanding the risk of bushfire and managing the landscape to reduce risks. Spatially and temporally homogenous climate data are essential for optimising planned burning and land management strategies, and scenario planning for major fire events. This paper summarises the development of a homogeneous 41-year (1972–2012) hourly 4-km gridded climate dataset for the fire-prone state of Victoria, Australia. This dataset has been generated using a combination of mesoscale modelling, global reanalysis data, surface observations, and historic observed rainfall analyses. Outputs include surface weather variables such as hourly temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction. The output data are created using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. Outputs provide an almost limitless opportunity for hitherto unavailable analyses – such as identifying the frequency of extremes and identifying trends over the 41-year period. Furthermore, the hourly mesoscale wind fields provide a homogeneous long-period data set with which to drive fire spread models such as Phoenix. This paper describes generation of the dataset, evaluation of the outputs and highlights its use and relevance for fire management.

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Harris S, Mills G, Brown T, Podnar D, Reinbold H, Fearon M. Victoria fire weather climatology dataset. In Rumsewicz M, editor, Research Proceedings from the 2015 Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC & AFAC Conference. East Melbourne Victoria Australia: Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC. 2015. p. 93-110