Venom as a source of useful biologically active molecules

Paul Bailey, Jacqueline Wilce

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the specialty area of venomology, emergency physicians traditionally have been most interested in the description of a variety of envenomation syndromes and, subsequent to this, the most appropriate investigative and therapeutic strategies to employ when envenomation is present. Taking an alternative viewpoint, in this paper we have reviewed a selection of interesting areas of biomedical research in which venom components are being investigated for their potential as novel therapeutic agents, pesticides and ion-channel probes. In addition, we describe the molecular imaging tools of X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, key techniques in the development of rationally designed therapeutic agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-36
Number of pages9
JournalEmergency Medicine
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Apr 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Drug design
  • Ion channel
  • Structural studies
  • Toxin structure
  • Venom

Cite this

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Venom as a source of useful biologically active molecules. / Bailey, Paul; Wilce, Jacqueline.

In: Emergency Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 1, 17.04.2001, p. 28-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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