Use of free interpositional vein grafts as pedicles for prefabrication of skin flaps

Yvonne T. Wilson, Samir Kumta, Michael J. Hickey, John V. Hurley, Wayne A. Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pedicles created from a long vein graft increase the scope and applications of prefabricated skin flaps. This study reports the survival and pattern of neovascularization of lower abdominal skin flaps in rabbits based on a pedicle formed by interposition of a long vein graft between the divided ipsilateral femoral artery and vein. Flaps were elevated 2–5 weeks after pedicle implantation and the surviving area quantitated and vascular patterns examined 1 week later. Only 8 out of 35 flaps were greater than 50% alive, the most frequent cause of flap failure being pedicle non‐patency. If the pedicle remained patent, complete flap survival was possible as early as 2 weeks after implantation. In non‐patent pedicles, recanalization or formation of a new vascular network may, given at least 4 weeks, be sufficient to ensure partial flap survival. The findings indicate that implantation of a long, skeletonized vein graft is an unreliable method of prefabrication of abdominal skin flaps in this model. © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)717-721
Number of pages5
JournalMicrosurgery
Volume15
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1994
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Wilson, Yvonne T. ; Kumta, Samir ; Hickey, Michael J. ; Hurley, John V. ; Morrison, Wayne A. / Use of free interpositional vein grafts as pedicles for prefabrication of skin flaps. In: Microsurgery. 1994 ; Vol. 15, No. 10. pp. 717-721.
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Use of free interpositional vein grafts as pedicles for prefabrication of skin flaps. / Wilson, Yvonne T.; Kumta, Samir; Hickey, Michael J.; Hurley, John V.; Morrison, Wayne A.

In: Microsurgery, Vol. 15, No. 10, 01.01.1994, p. 717-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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