Understanding the potential of facilities managers to be advocates for energy efficiency retrofits in mid-tier commercial office buildings

Jim Curtis, Andrea Walton, Michael Dodd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Realising energy efficiency opportunities in new commercial office buildings is an easier task than retrofitting older, mid-tier building stock. As a result, a number of government programs aim to support retrofits by offering grants, upgrades, and energy audits to facilitate energy efficiency opportunities. This study reports on a state government program in Victoria, Australia, where the uptake of such offerings was lower than expected, prompting the program team to consider whether targeting facilities managers (FMs), rather than building owners, might be a better way of delivering the program. The influences and practices of FMs that impact on their ability to be advocates for energy efficiency were explored. The results revealed that complex building ownership arrangements, poor communication skills, isolation from key decision making processes, a lack of credible business cases and information, split incentives, and the prospect of business disruptions can all impact on FMs’ ability to drive organizational change. Future program efforts should continue to interrogate the social context of retrofits in mid-tier buildings, including other influences and influencers beyond FMs, and adapt accordingly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-104
Number of pages7
JournalEnergy Policy
Volume103
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

Keywords

  • Buildings
  • Decision-making
  • Facilities management
  • Government programs

Cite this

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Understanding the potential of facilities managers to be advocates for energy efficiency retrofits in mid-tier commercial office buildings. / Curtis, Jim; Walton, Andrea; Dodd, Michael.

In: Energy Policy, Vol. 103, 01.04.2017, p. 98-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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