Two hands are better than one

A new assessment method and a new interpretation of the non-visual illusion of self-touch

Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies, Martin Davies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A simple experimental paradigm creates the powerful illusion that one is touching one's own hand even when the two hands are separated by 15. cm. The participant uses her right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner provides identical stimulation to the participant's receptive left hand. Change in felt position of the receptive hand toward the prosthetic hand has previously led to the interpretation that the participant experiences self-touch at the location of the prosthetic hand, and experiences a sense of ownership of the prosthetic hand. Our results argue against this interpretation. We assessed change in felt position of the participant's receptive hand but we also assessed change in felt position of the participant's administering hand. Change in felt position of the administering hand was significantly greater than change in felt position of the receptive hand. Implications for theories of ownership are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)956-964
Number of pages9
JournalConsciousness and Cognition
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Body representation
  • Proprioceptive drift
  • Rubber hand illusion
  • Self-touch

Cite this

White, Rebekah C. ; Aimola Davies, Anne M. ; Davies, Martin. / Two hands are better than one : A new assessment method and a new interpretation of the non-visual illusion of self-touch. In: Consciousness and Cognition. 2011 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 956-964.
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Two hands are better than one : A new assessment method and a new interpretation of the non-visual illusion of self-touch. / White, Rebekah C.; Aimola Davies, Anne M.; Davies, Martin.

In: Consciousness and Cognition, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.09.2011, p. 956-964.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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