Traumatic spinal cord injury in Victoria, 2007–2016

Ben Beck, Peter A Cameron, Sandra Braaf, Andrew Nunn, Mark C Fitzgerald, Rodney T. Judson, Warwick J. Teague, Alyse Lennox, James W. Middleton, James E. Harrison, Belinda J Gabbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To investigate trends in the incidence and causes of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in Victoria over a 10-year period. Design, setting, participants: Retrospective cohort study: analysis of Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR) data for people who sustained TSCIs during 2007–2016. Main outcomes and measures: Temporal trends in population-based incidence rates of TSCI (injury to the spinal cord with an Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score of 4 or more). Results: There were 706 cases of TSCI, most the result of transport events (269 cases, 38%) or low falls (197 cases, 28%). The overall crude incidence of TSCI was 1.26 cases per 100 000 population (95% CI, 1.17–1.36 per 100 000 population), and did not change over the study period (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.01; 95% CI, 0.99–1.04). However, the incidence of TSCI resulting from low falls increased by 9% per year (95% CI, 4–15%). The proportion of TSCI cases classified as incomplete tetraplegia increased from 41% in 2007 to 55% in 2016 (P < 0.001). Overall in-hospital mortality was 15% (104 deaths), and was highest among people aged 65 years or more (31%, 70 deaths). Conclusions: Given the devastating consequences of TSCI, improved primary prevention strategies are needed, particularly as the incidence of TSCI did not decline over the study period. The epidemiologic profile of TSCI has shifted, with an increasing number of TSCI events in older adults. This change has implications for prevention, acute and post-discharge care, and support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-366
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume210
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Trauma, nervous system
  • Traumatology

Cite this

Beck, Ben ; Cameron, Peter A ; Braaf, Sandra ; Nunn, Andrew ; Fitzgerald, Mark C ; Judson, Rodney T. ; Teague, Warwick J. ; Lennox, Alyse ; Middleton, James W. ; Harrison, James E. ; Gabbe, Belinda J. / Traumatic spinal cord injury in Victoria, 2007–2016. In: Medical Journal of Australia. 2019 ; Vol. 210, No. 8. pp. 360-366.
@article{7ee1a1658603478b9b8d509ea92a2000,
title = "Traumatic spinal cord injury in Victoria, 2007–2016",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate trends in the incidence and causes of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in Victoria over a 10-year period. Design, setting, participants: Retrospective cohort study: analysis of Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR) data for people who sustained TSCIs during 2007–2016. Main outcomes and measures: Temporal trends in population-based incidence rates of TSCI (injury to the spinal cord with an Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score of 4 or more). Results: There were 706 cases of TSCI, most the result of transport events (269 cases, 38{\%}) or low falls (197 cases, 28{\%}). The overall crude incidence of TSCI was 1.26 cases per 100 000 population (95{\%} CI, 1.17–1.36 per 100 000 population), and did not change over the study period (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.01; 95{\%} CI, 0.99–1.04). However, the incidence of TSCI resulting from low falls increased by 9{\%} per year (95{\%} CI, 4–15{\%}). The proportion of TSCI cases classified as incomplete tetraplegia increased from 41{\%} in 2007 to 55{\%} in 2016 (P < 0.001). Overall in-hospital mortality was 15{\%} (104 deaths), and was highest among people aged 65 years or more (31{\%}, 70 deaths). Conclusions: Given the devastating consequences of TSCI, improved primary prevention strategies are needed, particularly as the incidence of TSCI did not decline over the study period. The epidemiologic profile of TSCI has shifted, with an increasing number of TSCI events in older adults. This change has implications for prevention, acute and post-discharge care, and support.",
keywords = "Epidemiology, Spinal cord injuries, Trauma, nervous system, Traumatology",
author = "Ben Beck and Cameron, {Peter A} and Sandra Braaf and Andrew Nunn and Fitzgerald, {Mark C} and Judson, {Rodney T.} and Teague, {Warwick J.} and Alyse Lennox and Middleton, {James W.} and Harrison, {James E.} and Gabbe, {Belinda J}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5694/mja2.50143",
language = "English",
volume = "210",
pages = "360--366",
journal = "Medical Journal of Australia",
issn = "0025-729X",
publisher = "AMPCo",
number = "8",

}

Traumatic spinal cord injury in Victoria, 2007–2016. / Beck, Ben; Cameron, Peter A; Braaf, Sandra; Nunn, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Mark C; Judson, Rodney T.; Teague, Warwick J.; Lennox, Alyse; Middleton, James W.; Harrison, James E.; Gabbe, Belinda J.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 210, No. 8, 01.05.2019, p. 360-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Traumatic spinal cord injury in Victoria, 2007–2016

AU - Beck, Ben

AU - Cameron, Peter A

AU - Braaf, Sandra

AU - Nunn, Andrew

AU - Fitzgerald, Mark C

AU - Judson, Rodney T.

AU - Teague, Warwick J.

AU - Lennox, Alyse

AU - Middleton, James W.

AU - Harrison, James E.

AU - Gabbe, Belinda J

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Objective: To investigate trends in the incidence and causes of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in Victoria over a 10-year period. Design, setting, participants: Retrospective cohort study: analysis of Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR) data for people who sustained TSCIs during 2007–2016. Main outcomes and measures: Temporal trends in population-based incidence rates of TSCI (injury to the spinal cord with an Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score of 4 or more). Results: There were 706 cases of TSCI, most the result of transport events (269 cases, 38%) or low falls (197 cases, 28%). The overall crude incidence of TSCI was 1.26 cases per 100 000 population (95% CI, 1.17–1.36 per 100 000 population), and did not change over the study period (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.01; 95% CI, 0.99–1.04). However, the incidence of TSCI resulting from low falls increased by 9% per year (95% CI, 4–15%). The proportion of TSCI cases classified as incomplete tetraplegia increased from 41% in 2007 to 55% in 2016 (P < 0.001). Overall in-hospital mortality was 15% (104 deaths), and was highest among people aged 65 years or more (31%, 70 deaths). Conclusions: Given the devastating consequences of TSCI, improved primary prevention strategies are needed, particularly as the incidence of TSCI did not decline over the study period. The epidemiologic profile of TSCI has shifted, with an increasing number of TSCI events in older adults. This change has implications for prevention, acute and post-discharge care, and support.

AB - Objective: To investigate trends in the incidence and causes of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in Victoria over a 10-year period. Design, setting, participants: Retrospective cohort study: analysis of Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR) data for people who sustained TSCIs during 2007–2016. Main outcomes and measures: Temporal trends in population-based incidence rates of TSCI (injury to the spinal cord with an Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score of 4 or more). Results: There were 706 cases of TSCI, most the result of transport events (269 cases, 38%) or low falls (197 cases, 28%). The overall crude incidence of TSCI was 1.26 cases per 100 000 population (95% CI, 1.17–1.36 per 100 000 population), and did not change over the study period (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.01; 95% CI, 0.99–1.04). However, the incidence of TSCI resulting from low falls increased by 9% per year (95% CI, 4–15%). The proportion of TSCI cases classified as incomplete tetraplegia increased from 41% in 2007 to 55% in 2016 (P < 0.001). Overall in-hospital mortality was 15% (104 deaths), and was highest among people aged 65 years or more (31%, 70 deaths). Conclusions: Given the devastating consequences of TSCI, improved primary prevention strategies are needed, particularly as the incidence of TSCI did not decline over the study period. The epidemiologic profile of TSCI has shifted, with an increasing number of TSCI events in older adults. This change has implications for prevention, acute and post-discharge care, and support.

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Spinal cord injuries

KW - Trauma, nervous system

KW - Traumatology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065194410&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5694/mja2.50143

DO - 10.5694/mja2.50143

M3 - Article

VL - 210

SP - 360

EP - 366

JO - Medical Journal of Australia

JF - Medical Journal of Australia

SN - 0025-729X

IS - 8

ER -