Toward a model of continuous care: a necessity for caregiving partners

Melissa P Masterson, Karen E Hurley, Talia I Zaider, David Kissane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Caregiving partners constitute a unique group, who provide both physical and emotional care for patients. There has been extensive research conducted on caregivers during either the caregiving or bereavement phase; however, these phases are often treated as separate entities rather than as part of a continuum. Method: In this paper, utilizing relevant literature and clinical observations, we map the emotional journey and lived experience of caregivers moving from disease progression, to the end of life, to the dying process itself, and then through life after the death of a partner. Along this journey, we identify the links between pre-death caregiving and bereavement. Results: Our illustration raises awareness regarding the unmet needs experienced by caregiving partners across the continuum and provides an alternative framework through which clinicians can view this course. Significance: of Results We bolster arguments for improved palliative care services and early interventions with distressed caregiving partners by emphasizing continuity of care both before and after a patient s death.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1459 - 1467
Number of pages9
JournalPalliative and Supportive Care
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

Masterson, Melissa P ; Hurley, Karen E ; Zaider, Talia I ; Kissane, David. / Toward a model of continuous care: a necessity for caregiving partners. In: Palliative and Supportive Care. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 1459 - 1467.
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Toward a model of continuous care: a necessity for caregiving partners. / Masterson, Melissa P; Hurley, Karen E; Zaider, Talia I; Kissane, David.

In: Palliative and Supportive Care, Vol. 13, No. 5, 2015, p. 1459 - 1467.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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