'To finish, we must finish': Everyday practices of depletion in Sri Lankan export-processing zones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The integrative dynamic between social reproduction (SR) and the market economy is underscored by the everyday experience of what can be termed depletion for many women in the Global South. Drawing upon case study material from Sri Lanka, this paper focuses on migration decisions to work in export-processing zones (EPZs) and everyday production processes. It shows how workplaces are sites of depletion. Depletion reproduces the processes of disposability in global factories. Relations of SR are also reproduced in the factory. Affecting body and mind, depletion flourishes in environments without recourse to adequate inputs that maintain well-being including, but not limited to, leisure and rest, adequate wages, freedom of association, adequate nutrition, housing, and job security. In Sri Lanka, migration to EPZs was prompted by a crisis in SR and lack of inflows to sustain the well-being of women and households. Such workplaces are also an everyday day element of the global political economy, enacted upon gendered bodies, fuelling a cycle of gendered harm through the reproduction of disposability.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)861-875
Number of pages15
JournalGlobalizations
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • depletion
  • export processing zone
  • gendered harm
  • Sri Lanka
  • social reproduction

Cite this