The weekly associations between climatic factors and Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria in China, 2005-2014

Samuel Hundessa, Gail Williams, Shanshan Li, Jinpeng Guo, Wenyi Zhang, Yuming Guo

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Meteorological factors play a crucial role in malaria transmission, but limited evidence is available from China. This study aimed to estimate the weekly associations between meteorological factors and Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria in China. Methods: The Distributed Lag Non-Linear Model was used to examine non-linearity and delayed effects of average temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, sunshine hours, wind speed and atmospheric pressure on malaria. Results: Average temperature was associated with P. vivax and P. falciparum cases over long ranges of lags. The effect was more immediate on P. vivax (0-6 weeks) than on P. falciparum (1-9 weeks). Relative humidity was associated with P. vivax and P. falciparum over 8-10 weeks and 5-8 weeks lag, respectively. A significant effect of wind speed on P. vivax was observed at 0-2 weeks lag, but no association was found with P. falciparum. Rainfall had a decreasing effect on P. vivax, but no association was found with P. falciparum. Sunshine hours were negatively associated with P. falciparum, but the association was unclear for P. vixax. However, the effects of atmospheric pressure on both malaria types were not significant at any lag. Conclusions: Our study highlights a substantial effect of weekly climatic factors on P. vivax and P. falciparum malaria transmission in China, with different lags. This provides an evidence base for health authorities in developing a malaria early-warning system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-219
Number of pages9
JournalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume111
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2017

Keywords

  • Climate factors
  • Lag effect
  • Malaria
  • P. falciparum
  • P. vivax
  • Weekly

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