The theory and practice of catching, holding, moving and releasing animals

Kevin Parker, Molly Dickens, Rohan Clarke, Tim Lovegrove

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The translocation process is essentially a forced dispersal event with no evolutionary precedent. Mortality immediately post-release is a critical determinant in the successful establishment of a new population (Armstrong Seddon, 2008;see Box 6.1 in Armstong Reynolds, this volume, Chapter 6). Therefore, although few reintroduction plans include success criteria at the individual level (Jule et all., 2008), the condition of animals immediately post-release is likely to be an important factor for hte successful translocation outcome (Dickens et al., 2010).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationReintroduction Biology: Integrating Science and Management
EditorsJohn G Ewen, Doug P Armstrong, Kevin A Parker, Philip J Seddon
Place of PublicationWest Sussex UK
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages105 - 137
Number of pages33
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9781405186742
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

Parker, K., Dickens, M., Clarke, R., & Lovegrove, T. (2012). The theory and practice of catching, holding, moving and releasing animals. In J. G. Ewen, D. P. Armstrong, K. A. Parker, & P. J. Seddon (Eds.), Reintroduction Biology: Integrating Science and Management (1 ed., pp. 105 - 137). Wiley-Blackwell.