The role of glucose in supporting cognition and mood regulation

Andrew Scholey, Riccarda Peters, Carlee Cleeland, David White

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

Abstract

ABSTRACT
Understanding the relationships between central physiological processes, performance and experiential phenomena remains elusive. One method of better understanding their interrelationships is to examine the neural substrates involved in cognitive enhancement. The available evidence suggests that there may be some neuropsychological specificity to the effect, but that the effect is more pronounced under conditions of mental effort. One method of better understanding their interrelationships is to examine the neural substrates involved in cognitive enhancement. With respect to glucose enhancement of cognitive performance, the notion that metabolic processes are crucial is supported by the knowledge that central insulin sensitivity and the GLUT family of glucose transporters in the central nervous system (CNS) are demonstrably involved. The effects of glucose are comparable with those observed after administration of pharmaceutical cognitive enhancers. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases associated with impaired glucoregulation as a result of dysfunctional insulin secretion or insulin action.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Routledge International Handbook of Psychobiology
EditorsPhilip N. Murphy
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter13
Pages209-218
Number of pages10
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781317283997, 9781317283980, 9781315642765
ISBN (Print)9781138188006
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

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