Abstract

Background: Diverticular disease is a common, chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel. This study investigates the differences in body composition between patients with diverticular disease and those without. Methods: Appropriate patients were identified using a search of the radiology database. Demographic and disease information was gathered using scanned medical records. Body composition analysis was performed at level L3 using single-slice computed tomography techniques. Results: Two hundred seventy-one patients were included in this study: 83 controls, 93 with diverticulosis and 95 with diverticulitis. Diverticulitis and diverticulosis were associated with a significantly higher visceral fat area (VFA), than the control group (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Diverticulitis and diverticulosis were associated with a significantly higher visceral fat area to subcutaneous fat area ratio (VFA:SCFA), than the control group (p = 0.005, p = 0.019). Only diverticulosis was associated with increased levels of extramyocellular fat, when compared to the control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Diverticular disease is associated with a higher amount and a higher proportion of visceral fat than seen in controls without diverticular disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1299-1302
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
Volume33
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Diverticulosis
  • Diverticulum
  • Extramyocellular fat
  • Visceral fat

Cite this

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title = "The role of body composition in diverticular disease",
abstract = "Background: Diverticular disease is a common, chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel. This study investigates the differences in body composition between patients with diverticular disease and those without. Methods: Appropriate patients were identified using a search of the radiology database. Demographic and disease information was gathered using scanned medical records. Body composition analysis was performed at level L3 using single-slice computed tomography techniques. Results: Two hundred seventy-one patients were included in this study: 83 controls, 93 with diverticulosis and 95 with diverticulitis. Diverticulitis and diverticulosis were associated with a significantly higher visceral fat area (VFA), than the control group (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Diverticulitis and diverticulosis were associated with a significantly higher visceral fat area to subcutaneous fat area ratio (VFA:SCFA), than the control group (p = 0.005, p = 0.019). Only diverticulosis was associated with increased levels of extramyocellular fat, when compared to the control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Diverticular disease is associated with a higher amount and a higher proportion of visceral fat than seen in controls without diverticular disease.",
keywords = "Body composition, Diverticulosis, Diverticulum, Extramyocellular fat, Visceral fat",
author = "Julia Freckelton and Darcy Holt and Adina Borsaru and Gwini, {Stella May} and Daniel Croagh and Gregory Moore",
year = "2018",
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}

The role of body composition in diverticular disease. / Freckelton, Julia; Holt, Darcy; Borsaru, Adina; Gwini, Stella May; Croagh, Daniel; Moore, Gregory.

In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, Vol. 33, No. 9, 09.2018, p. 1299-1302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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N2 - Background: Diverticular disease is a common, chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel. This study investigates the differences in body composition between patients with diverticular disease and those without. Methods: Appropriate patients were identified using a search of the radiology database. Demographic and disease information was gathered using scanned medical records. Body composition analysis was performed at level L3 using single-slice computed tomography techniques. Results: Two hundred seventy-one patients were included in this study: 83 controls, 93 with diverticulosis and 95 with diverticulitis. Diverticulitis and diverticulosis were associated with a significantly higher visceral fat area (VFA), than the control group (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Diverticulitis and diverticulosis were associated with a significantly higher visceral fat area to subcutaneous fat area ratio (VFA:SCFA), than the control group (p = 0.005, p = 0.019). Only diverticulosis was associated with increased levels of extramyocellular fat, when compared to the control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Diverticular disease is associated with a higher amount and a higher proportion of visceral fat than seen in controls without diverticular disease.

AB - Background: Diverticular disease is a common, chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel. This study investigates the differences in body composition between patients with diverticular disease and those without. Methods: Appropriate patients were identified using a search of the radiology database. Demographic and disease information was gathered using scanned medical records. Body composition analysis was performed at level L3 using single-slice computed tomography techniques. Results: Two hundred seventy-one patients were included in this study: 83 controls, 93 with diverticulosis and 95 with diverticulitis. Diverticulitis and diverticulosis were associated with a significantly higher visceral fat area (VFA), than the control group (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Diverticulitis and diverticulosis were associated with a significantly higher visceral fat area to subcutaneous fat area ratio (VFA:SCFA), than the control group (p = 0.005, p = 0.019). Only diverticulosis was associated with increased levels of extramyocellular fat, when compared to the control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Diverticular disease is associated with a higher amount and a higher proportion of visceral fat than seen in controls without diverticular disease.

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