The role of androgen therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The concept of an androgen deficiency syndrome in women is a relatively old one, although it has gained substantially increased attention in recent years. Androgens are quantitatively the predominant sex steroid in women, circulating in the micro- and nanomolar concentration range, compared with picomolar levels of oestrogen. The most significant biologically active androgen is testosterone, which circulates bound tightly to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and loosely to albumin. It is generally held that the non-SHBG bound fraction is the bioavailable moiety. Hence interpretable testosterone measurements require data on total concentrations as well as the SHBG level. Testosterone deficiency occurs in a number of situations such as hypopituitarism, primary ovarian and adrenal failure, exogenous corticosteroid use and oral oestrogen therapy (due to the elevation of SHBG and suppression of gonadotrophins). Clinical symptoms of androgen deficiency include lethargy, tiredness and loss of sex drive and interest, and have responded well to androgen replacement, generally without significant side-effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-393
Number of pages11
JournalBest Practice & Research: Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2002

Keywords

  • Dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate
  • Free testosterone
  • Hypopituitarism
  • Libido
  • Premature ovarian failure
  • Sex hormone-binding globulin
  • Testosterone
  • Well-being

Cite this

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title = "The role of androgen therapy",
abstract = "The concept of an androgen deficiency syndrome in women is a relatively old one, although it has gained substantially increased attention in recent years. Androgens are quantitatively the predominant sex steroid in women, circulating in the micro- and nanomolar concentration range, compared with picomolar levels of oestrogen. The most significant biologically active androgen is testosterone, which circulates bound tightly to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and loosely to albumin. It is generally held that the non-SHBG bound fraction is the bioavailable moiety. Hence interpretable testosterone measurements require data on total concentrations as well as the SHBG level. Testosterone deficiency occurs in a number of situations such as hypopituitarism, primary ovarian and adrenal failure, exogenous corticosteroid use and oral oestrogen therapy (due to the elevation of SHBG and suppression of gonadotrophins). Clinical symptoms of androgen deficiency include lethargy, tiredness and loss of sex drive and interest, and have responded well to androgen replacement, generally without significant side-effects.",
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The role of androgen therapy. / Burger, Henry G.; Davis, Susan R.

In: Best Practice & Research: Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Vol. 16, No. 3, 06.2002, p. 383-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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