The relationship between discharge medications and falls in post-hospitalised older adults

A 6-month follow-up

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To identify discharge medications, especially psychotropic medications that are associated with falls, amongst older adults within 6 months following hospitalisation. Methods: Negative binomial regression was used to examine relationships between discharge medications and falls in older post-hospitalised adults. Multiple regression that considered falls risk factors at discharge was performed. Results: Data for 267 participants showed that discharge medications were not independently associated with falls postdischarge after adjustment for other falls risk factors. Male gender (adjusted incidence rate ratio [95% confidence interval, CI]) 2.15 [1.36-3.40]), higher depression scores (1.14 [1.05-1.25]) and co-morbidity of neurological disease other than stroke (5.98 [3.08-11.60]) were independently associated with an increased rate of falls. Higher depression scores (1.20 [1.11-1.31]) and co-morbidity of cancer (1.97 [1.20-3.25]) were independently associated with an increased rate of injurious falls in the 6 months postdischarge. Conclusion: Falls prevention strategies, other than hospital discharge medication management in the postdischarge older adults, warrant investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-198
Number of pages9
JournalAustralasian Journal on Ageing
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

Keywords

  • aged
  • discharge
  • falls
  • hospitals
  • Medication Therapy Management
  • patient

Cite this

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title = "The relationship between discharge medications and falls in post-hospitalised older adults: A 6-month follow-up",
abstract = "Objective: To identify discharge medications, especially psychotropic medications that are associated with falls, amongst older adults within 6 months following hospitalisation. Methods: Negative binomial regression was used to examine relationships between discharge medications and falls in older post-hospitalised adults. Multiple regression that considered falls risk factors at discharge was performed. Results: Data for 267 participants showed that discharge medications were not independently associated with falls postdischarge after adjustment for other falls risk factors. Male gender (adjusted incidence rate ratio [95{\%} confidence interval, CI]) 2.15 [1.36-3.40]), higher depression scores (1.14 [1.05-1.25]) and co-morbidity of neurological disease other than stroke (5.98 [3.08-11.60]) were independently associated with an increased rate of falls. Higher depression scores (1.20 [1.11-1.31]) and co-morbidity of cancer (1.97 [1.20-3.25]) were independently associated with an increased rate of injurious falls in the 6 months postdischarge. Conclusion: Falls prevention strategies, other than hospital discharge medication management in the postdischarge older adults, warrant investigation.",
keywords = "aged, discharge, falls, hospitals, Medication Therapy Management, patient",
author = "Kenneth Lam and Lee, {Den-Ching A.} and Lalor, {Aislinn F.} and Rene Stolwyk and Grant Russell and Ted Brown and Fiona McDermott and Haines, {Terry P.}",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/ajag.12628",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "190--198",
journal = "Australasian Journal on Ageing",
issn = "1440-6381",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

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T1 - The relationship between discharge medications and falls in post-hospitalised older adults

T2 - A 6-month follow-up

AU - Lam, Kenneth

AU - Lee, Den-Ching A.

AU - Lalor, Aislinn F.

AU - Stolwyk, Rene

AU - Russell, Grant

AU - Brown, Ted

AU - McDermott, Fiona

AU - Haines, Terry P.

PY - 2019/9

Y1 - 2019/9

N2 - Objective: To identify discharge medications, especially psychotropic medications that are associated with falls, amongst older adults within 6 months following hospitalisation. Methods: Negative binomial regression was used to examine relationships between discharge medications and falls in older post-hospitalised adults. Multiple regression that considered falls risk factors at discharge was performed. Results: Data for 267 participants showed that discharge medications were not independently associated with falls postdischarge after adjustment for other falls risk factors. Male gender (adjusted incidence rate ratio [95% confidence interval, CI]) 2.15 [1.36-3.40]), higher depression scores (1.14 [1.05-1.25]) and co-morbidity of neurological disease other than stroke (5.98 [3.08-11.60]) were independently associated with an increased rate of falls. Higher depression scores (1.20 [1.11-1.31]) and co-morbidity of cancer (1.97 [1.20-3.25]) were independently associated with an increased rate of injurious falls in the 6 months postdischarge. Conclusion: Falls prevention strategies, other than hospital discharge medication management in the postdischarge older adults, warrant investigation.

AB - Objective: To identify discharge medications, especially psychotropic medications that are associated with falls, amongst older adults within 6 months following hospitalisation. Methods: Negative binomial regression was used to examine relationships between discharge medications and falls in older post-hospitalised adults. Multiple regression that considered falls risk factors at discharge was performed. Results: Data for 267 participants showed that discharge medications were not independently associated with falls postdischarge after adjustment for other falls risk factors. Male gender (adjusted incidence rate ratio [95% confidence interval, CI]) 2.15 [1.36-3.40]), higher depression scores (1.14 [1.05-1.25]) and co-morbidity of neurological disease other than stroke (5.98 [3.08-11.60]) were independently associated with an increased rate of falls. Higher depression scores (1.20 [1.11-1.31]) and co-morbidity of cancer (1.97 [1.20-3.25]) were independently associated with an increased rate of injurious falls in the 6 months postdischarge. Conclusion: Falls prevention strategies, other than hospital discharge medication management in the postdischarge older adults, warrant investigation.

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