The reinvention of twentieth century microscopy for three-dimensional imaging

Lachlan W. Whitehead, Kate McArthur, Niall D. Geoghegan, Kelly L Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleOtherpeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In just over a decade, the field of biomedical research has witnessed a radical evolution in technologies for the 3- and 4-dimensional imaging of biological samples. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy is quickly developing into a powerful approach for fast, volumetric imaging of cells, tissues and living organisms. This review touches on the development of 3-dimensional imaging, from its foundations, namely from the invention of confocal microscopy in the twentieth century to more recent examples, notably the IsoView SPIM, the Lattice Light Sheet Microscope and swept confocally aligned planar excitation. These technologies overcome the limitations of conventional optical sectioning techniques and enable unprecedented levels of spatiooral resolution with low levels of phototoxicity. Developing in parallel with powerful computational approaches, light sheet based methods promise to completely transform cell biology as we know it today.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)520-524
Number of pages5
JournalImmunology and Cell Biology
Volume95
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

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