The public bicycle-sharing scheme in Brisbane, Australia

Evaluating the influence of its introduction on changes in time spent cycling amongst a middle- and older-age population

Eva Heinen, Md Kamruzzaman, Gavin Turrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Active travel may improve individual health as it contributes to higher levels of physical activity, particularly in an aging society. Bicycle-sharing schemes may contribute to public health by encouraging active travel. Aim: To investigate whether exposure to a bicycle-sharing scheme—measured as residential proximity to a bicycle station—was associated with the propensity to use it. Second, we aimed to study the extent to which exposure to the scheme was associated with a change in time spent cycling. Method: In this natural-experimental study, we analysed a large panel of residents in Brisbane, Australia, who were surveyed before and after the introduction of a bicycle-sharing scheme in 2010. Data were collected as part of the HABITAT study, a multilevel longitudinal investigation of physical activity and health among ‘baby boomers’ (persons aged 40–65). Data were collected in 2009 (n = 7866), 2011 (n = 6900), and 2013 (n = 6520). Two self-reported outcome variables were examined: (1) a stages-of-change variable measuring the likelihood of using the scheme and the intention to use it in the future, and (2) change in time spent cycling between 2009 and 2013. Results: In the unadjusted model, proximity was significantly associated with stages of change, but became non-significant after adjustment. Moreover, higher levels of exposure to the intervention did not predict a change in time spent cycling. Younger respondents and respondents with a higher education level were more likely to consider using the bicycle-sharing scheme. Individuals who had a college degree were more likely to have used this scheme. Conclusion: Residential proximity to a bicycle-sharing station was not found to be associated with the use of the bicycle-sharing scheme nor did its introduction significantly predict an increase in time spent cycling. Other interventions may be more supportive of increasing cycling in the baby boomer cohort, and, thereby, improving their overall health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-73
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Transport and Health
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Bicycle-sharing schemes
  • Built environment
  • Cycling
  • Natural experiment
  • Physical activity

Cite this

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title = "The public bicycle-sharing scheme in Brisbane, Australia: Evaluating the influence of its introduction on changes in time spent cycling amongst a middle- and older-age population",
abstract = "Background: Active travel may improve individual health as it contributes to higher levels of physical activity, particularly in an aging society. Bicycle-sharing schemes may contribute to public health by encouraging active travel. Aim: To investigate whether exposure to a bicycle-sharing scheme—measured as residential proximity to a bicycle station—was associated with the propensity to use it. Second, we aimed to study the extent to which exposure to the scheme was associated with a change in time spent cycling. Method: In this natural-experimental study, we analysed a large panel of residents in Brisbane, Australia, who were surveyed before and after the introduction of a bicycle-sharing scheme in 2010. Data were collected as part of the HABITAT study, a multilevel longitudinal investigation of physical activity and health among ‘baby boomers’ (persons aged 40–65). Data were collected in 2009 (n = 7866), 2011 (n = 6900), and 2013 (n = 6520). Two self-reported outcome variables were examined: (1) a stages-of-change variable measuring the likelihood of using the scheme and the intention to use it in the future, and (2) change in time spent cycling between 2009 and 2013. Results: In the unadjusted model, proximity was significantly associated with stages of change, but became non-significant after adjustment. Moreover, higher levels of exposure to the intervention did not predict a change in time spent cycling. Younger respondents and respondents with a higher education level were more likely to consider using the bicycle-sharing scheme. Individuals who had a college degree were more likely to have used this scheme. Conclusion: Residential proximity to a bicycle-sharing station was not found to be associated with the use of the bicycle-sharing scheme nor did its introduction significantly predict an increase in time spent cycling. Other interventions may be more supportive of increasing cycling in the baby boomer cohort, and, thereby, improving their overall health.",
keywords = "Bicycle-sharing schemes, Built environment, Cycling, Natural experiment, Physical activity",
author = "Eva Heinen and Md Kamruzzaman and Gavin Turrell",
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language = "English",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - The public bicycle-sharing scheme in Brisbane, Australia

T2 - Evaluating the influence of its introduction on changes in time spent cycling amongst a middle- and older-age population

AU - Heinen, Eva

AU - Kamruzzaman, Md

AU - Turrell, Gavin

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Background: Active travel may improve individual health as it contributes to higher levels of physical activity, particularly in an aging society. Bicycle-sharing schemes may contribute to public health by encouraging active travel. Aim: To investigate whether exposure to a bicycle-sharing scheme—measured as residential proximity to a bicycle station—was associated with the propensity to use it. Second, we aimed to study the extent to which exposure to the scheme was associated with a change in time spent cycling. Method: In this natural-experimental study, we analysed a large panel of residents in Brisbane, Australia, who were surveyed before and after the introduction of a bicycle-sharing scheme in 2010. Data were collected as part of the HABITAT study, a multilevel longitudinal investigation of physical activity and health among ‘baby boomers’ (persons aged 40–65). Data were collected in 2009 (n = 7866), 2011 (n = 6900), and 2013 (n = 6520). Two self-reported outcome variables were examined: (1) a stages-of-change variable measuring the likelihood of using the scheme and the intention to use it in the future, and (2) change in time spent cycling between 2009 and 2013. Results: In the unadjusted model, proximity was significantly associated with stages of change, but became non-significant after adjustment. Moreover, higher levels of exposure to the intervention did not predict a change in time spent cycling. Younger respondents and respondents with a higher education level were more likely to consider using the bicycle-sharing scheme. Individuals who had a college degree were more likely to have used this scheme. Conclusion: Residential proximity to a bicycle-sharing station was not found to be associated with the use of the bicycle-sharing scheme nor did its introduction significantly predict an increase in time spent cycling. Other interventions may be more supportive of increasing cycling in the baby boomer cohort, and, thereby, improving their overall health.

AB - Background: Active travel may improve individual health as it contributes to higher levels of physical activity, particularly in an aging society. Bicycle-sharing schemes may contribute to public health by encouraging active travel. Aim: To investigate whether exposure to a bicycle-sharing scheme—measured as residential proximity to a bicycle station—was associated with the propensity to use it. Second, we aimed to study the extent to which exposure to the scheme was associated with a change in time spent cycling. Method: In this natural-experimental study, we analysed a large panel of residents in Brisbane, Australia, who were surveyed before and after the introduction of a bicycle-sharing scheme in 2010. Data were collected as part of the HABITAT study, a multilevel longitudinal investigation of physical activity and health among ‘baby boomers’ (persons aged 40–65). Data were collected in 2009 (n = 7866), 2011 (n = 6900), and 2013 (n = 6520). Two self-reported outcome variables were examined: (1) a stages-of-change variable measuring the likelihood of using the scheme and the intention to use it in the future, and (2) change in time spent cycling between 2009 and 2013. Results: In the unadjusted model, proximity was significantly associated with stages of change, but became non-significant after adjustment. Moreover, higher levels of exposure to the intervention did not predict a change in time spent cycling. Younger respondents and respondents with a higher education level were more likely to consider using the bicycle-sharing scheme. Individuals who had a college degree were more likely to have used this scheme. Conclusion: Residential proximity to a bicycle-sharing station was not found to be associated with the use of the bicycle-sharing scheme nor did its introduction significantly predict an increase in time spent cycling. Other interventions may be more supportive of increasing cycling in the baby boomer cohort, and, thereby, improving their overall health.

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KW - Built environment

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KW - Natural experiment

KW - Physical activity

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DO - 10.1016/j.jth.2018.07.003

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JO - Journal of Transport & Health

JF - Journal of Transport & Health

SN - 2214-1405

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