The neighbourhood context of crime against international students

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Stark differences exist between the support and accommodation provision for tertiary students across the UK, the US and Australia. Within this framework, this study provides insights into the neighbourhood contexts where offences against Indian international students took place in the western suburbs of Melbourne. Shaped by ideas associated with social disorganisation and resource threat theories, we suggest that the concentration of large numbers of international students without adequate supports in areas characterised by high levels of disadvantage, ethnic diversity and high levels of crime contributed to the victimisation of international students. The study aims to help better understand how the neighbourhood context influences hate crime more broadly and specifically examines the neighbourhood context of international student victimisation. The study is designed to provide a nuanced understanding of the circumstances leading to attacks against international students and contributes to the international student safety and hate crime victimisation literature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)609-626
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Sociology
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • hate crime
  • Indian students
  • international student housing
  • international student safety
  • international student support
  • neighbourhood contexts
  • resource threat theory
  • social disorganisation theory

Cite this

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The neighbourhood context of crime against international students. / Forbes-Mewett, Helen Margaret; Wickes, Rebecca Leigh.

In: Journal of Sociology, Vol. 54, No. 4, 2018, p. 609-626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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