The morphology of the human lymphatic vessels in the head and neck

Wei Ren Pan, Cara Michelle Le Roux, Sidney M. Levy, Christopher A. Briggs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previously little has been written about the morphology of the human lymphatic vessels since Sappey (Sappey [1874] Anatomie, Physiologie, Pathologie des Vaisseaux Lymphatiques, Paris: Adrien Delahaye) over 100 years ago. There needs to be an accurate re-evaluation of scientific observations to aid clinical management. Forty-nine combinations of tissue from the head and neck of 20 unembalmed human cadavers were studied. Six percent hydrogen peroxide was used to find the vessels. They were injected with radio-opaque mixture, dissected, photographed, and radiographed. Final results were transferred to the computer for analysis. Different sized lymphatic valves were found in the precollecting and collecting lymph vessels, the lymphatic trunks, and ducts. The intervals between the valves were of various lengths. Diverse lymphatic ampullae and diverticula were seen in precollecting and collecting lymph vessels. Initial lymph vessels arose from the dermis, the galea, and the mucosal membrane. The vasculature of the direct and indirect precollecting and collecting lymph vessels, lymphatic trunks, and ducts was recorded. The morphology of the human lymphatic vessels in the head and neck has been described and recorded using radiographs and photographs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)654-661
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Anatomy
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Ampulla
  • Diverticulum
  • Lymphatic vessel
  • Valve

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