The missing student voice in the Asia literacy discussion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Some important work has been done to embed studies of Asia across the Australian Curriculum, with organisations such as the Asia Education Foundation (AEF) just one of a number of groups providing quality teaching materials and data from empirical studies. However, with respect to our knowledge of student understandings of, and attitudes towards, Asia literacy, there are large gaps in the literature. Although the call for Australia to be more engaged and informed about our neighbouring countries goes back to at least the 1970s (Auchmuty, 1970), in the subsequent 40-plus years, there has been relatively little inquiry into what students really know and think about Asia and Asia literacy. This article outlines some of my own experiences teaching studies of Asia-related content, some of the challenges that this classroom experience brings to light and how my current research is based on the belief that if we wish to increase the levels of Asia literacy in our students, then we need to know more about our students' beliefs and perceptions of the concept of Asia literacy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-26
Number of pages3
JournalEthos: ideas for the classroom discussions & reviews
Volume22
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

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abstract = "Some important work has been done to embed studies of Asia across the Australian Curriculum, with organisations such as the Asia Education Foundation (AEF) just one of a number of groups providing quality teaching materials and data from empirical studies. However, with respect to our knowledge of student understandings of, and attitudes towards, Asia literacy, there are large gaps in the literature. Although the call for Australia to be more engaged and informed about our neighbouring countries goes back to at least the 1970s (Auchmuty, 1970), in the subsequent 40-plus years, there has been relatively little inquiry into what students really know and think about Asia and Asia literacy. This article outlines some of my own experiences teaching studies of Asia-related content, some of the challenges that this classroom experience brings to light and how my current research is based on the belief that if we wish to increase the levels of Asia literacy in our students, then we need to know more about our students' beliefs and perceptions of the concept of Asia literacy.",
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The missing student voice in the Asia literacy discussion. / Bonar, Gary.

In: Ethos: ideas for the classroom discussions & reviews, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2014, p. 24-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

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