The management of pulmonary embolism

Daniel Joseph Garner, David Pilcher

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common condition with significant mortality and morbidity. Its occurrence frequently triggers referral to critical care services. Patients within critical care environments are also at elevated risk of developing venous thromboembolism and PE further highlighting the need for critical care clinicians to be confident in their approach to the patient with PE. Furthermore, the co-morbid conditions in this patient group may present additional challenges both in diagnosis (e.g. safe access to radiology) and management (e.g. relative contraindication to anticoagulation/thrombolysis in trauma or intracranial haemorrhage). This brief review summarises the contemporary evidence base regarding both diagnosis of and treatment strategies for PE - drawing upon this to suggest a simple algorithm for investigation, risk stratification and management, particularly tailored to patients within a critical care setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)512-518
Number of pages7
JournalAnaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anticoagulation
  • Computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA)
  • Embolectomy
  • Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter
  • Massive pulmonary embolism
  • Pulmonary embolism
  • Submassive pulmonary embolism
  • Thrombolysis
  • Venous thromboembolism

Cite this

Garner, Daniel Joseph ; Pilcher, David. / The management of pulmonary embolism. In: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 11, No. 12. pp. 512-518.
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The management of pulmonary embolism. / Garner, Daniel Joseph; Pilcher, David.

In: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 12, 12.2010, p. 512-518.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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