THE LONG‐TERM EFFECT OF DISTAL LIENORENAL SHUNT SURGERY ON PORTAL VENOUS PRESSURE

P. R. Gibson, I. E. McInnes, F. J. Dudley

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Abstract

To assess whether portal venous pressure remains elevated following distal lienorenal shunt surgery, 11 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis were assessed from 0.5 to 59 months following the creation of a distal lienorenal shunt. These were compared with five patients following mesocaval shunt surgery and nine with cirrhosis alone. Portal pressure was measured by direct transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein or by determining intrahepatic pulp pressure. Splenic pulp pressure was also measured in the shunt groups at the time of assessment of shunt patency by scintisplenoportography. All shunts were patent. Four of five patients studied within 10 months of distal Henorenal shunt surgery had persisting portal hypertension (comparable with that in the cirrhosis alone group) and persisting portasplenic gradient. In contrast, five of six patients studied more than 10 months following surgery had portal pressures similar to that following mesocaval shunt surgery and no portasplenic gradient. Thus, with time, selective decompression tends to become total decompression. Whether this correlates with deterioration of hepatic function requires further study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)773-776
Number of pages4
JournalANZ Journal of Surgery
Volume56
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1986
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • distal lienorenal shunt
  • portal circulation
  • portal hypertension

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