The link between infant mortality and child nutrition in India

Is there any evidence of a gender bias?

Pushkar Maitra, Anu Rammohan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, using the 1998-1999 National Family Health Survey data-set from India, we study whether there are gender differentials in infant mortality and child nutrition. Our analysis finds no evidence of gender differentials in survival probability. However, conditional upon surviving the first year, girls are found to have poorer height-for-age outcomes. There are also significant regional differences in both survival probabilities and nutritional outcomes.We show that the height-for-age z-score is significantly lower for higher birth-order children (later-born children), and the effect is monotonically increasing. Finally, parental education and householdwealth have statistically significant effects on both survival outcomes and child nutrition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-110
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of the Asia Pacific Economy
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Gender bias
  • India
  • Infant mortality
  • Nutritional outcomes

Cite this

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The link between infant mortality and child nutrition in India : Is there any evidence of a gender bias? / Maitra, Pushkar; Rammohan, Anu.

In: Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, Vol. 16, No. 1, 14.01.2011, p. 81-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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