The Jekkora model of early intervention for suicidal ideation and psychological distress among Aboriginal communities

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Aboriginal people and men in particular have difficulty seeking help for their mental health problems (1). Disclosing their problems or sharing it with others appears to be a major obstacle (2). When Aboriginal people who have been struggling with personal issues for a long time do seek help, health workers often do not have the time (1or more hours) to listen to their stories. This makes individuals feel frustrated and uncared for. It also increases the risk of prolonged psychological distress and suicide ideation.

Aim: To develop a community based, transferable and sustainable Aboriginal model for early identification and referral of people with psychological distress and suicidal ideation.

Methods: The presentation will describe the rationale for, the development of and the usefulness of the Jekkora Model for the early identification of individuals showing signs of psychological distress or suicidal ideation. The model is built around a group of trained volunteers through a collaborative effort between the Social and emotional wellbeing service, the medical service and a mental health nurse.

Results: The Jekkora model improves access to culturally appropriate support and care for those displaying signs of psychological distress in rural Aboriginal communities. It is a good example of a locally developed, replicable, culturally acceptable, problem specific and result oriented service that is both cost effective and sustainable.

Conclusion: This model can be adapted for Indigenous peoples in other parts of the world
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event17th Canadian Collaborative Mental Health Care Conference - Coast Capri Hotel, Kelowna, B.C., Canada
Duration: 17 Jun 201618 Jun 2016

Conference

Conference17th Canadian Collaborative Mental Health Care Conference
CountryCanada
CityKelowna, B.C.
Period17/06/1618/06/16

Cite this

Hearn, S., Isaacs, A. N., & Sutton, K. (2016). The Jekkora model of early intervention for suicidal ideation and psychological distress among Aboriginal communities. Abstract from 17th Canadian Collaborative Mental Health Care Conference, Kelowna, B.C., Canada.
Hearn, Stuart ; Isaacs, Anton Neville ; Sutton, Keith. / The Jekkora model of early intervention for suicidal ideation and psychological distress among Aboriginal communities. Abstract from 17th Canadian Collaborative Mental Health Care Conference, Kelowna, B.C., Canada.
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abstract = "Background: Aboriginal people and men in particular have difficulty seeking help for their mental health problems (1). Disclosing their problems or sharing it with others appears to be a major obstacle (2). When Aboriginal people who have been struggling with personal issues for a long time do seek help, health workers often do not have the time (1or more hours) to listen to their stories. This makes individuals feel frustrated and uncared for. It also increases the risk of prolonged psychological distress and suicide ideation.Aim: To develop a community based, transferable and sustainable Aboriginal model for early identification and referral of people with psychological distress and suicidal ideation.Methods: The presentation will describe the rationale for, the development of and the usefulness of the Jekkora Model for the early identification of individuals showing signs of psychological distress or suicidal ideation. The model is built around a group of trained volunteers through a collaborative effort between the Social and emotional wellbeing service, the medical service and a mental health nurse.Results: The Jekkora model improves access to culturally appropriate support and care for those displaying signs of psychological distress in rural Aboriginal communities. It is a good example of a locally developed, replicable, culturally acceptable, problem specific and result oriented service that is both cost effective and sustainable.Conclusion: This model can be adapted for Indigenous peoples in other parts of the world",
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note = "17th Canadian Collaborative Mental Health Care Conference ; Conference date: 17-06-2016 Through 18-06-2016",

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Hearn, S, Isaacs, AN & Sutton, K 2016, 'The Jekkora model of early intervention for suicidal ideation and psychological distress among Aboriginal communities' 17th Canadian Collaborative Mental Health Care Conference, Kelowna, B.C., Canada, 17/06/16 - 18/06/16, .

The Jekkora model of early intervention for suicidal ideation and psychological distress among Aboriginal communities. / Hearn, Stuart; Isaacs, Anton Neville; Sutton, Keith.

2016. Abstract from 17th Canadian Collaborative Mental Health Care Conference, Kelowna, B.C., Canada.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

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T1 - The Jekkora model of early intervention for suicidal ideation and psychological distress among Aboriginal communities

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AU - Isaacs, Anton Neville

AU - Sutton, Keith

PY - 2016

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N2 - Background: Aboriginal people and men in particular have difficulty seeking help for their mental health problems (1). Disclosing their problems or sharing it with others appears to be a major obstacle (2). When Aboriginal people who have been struggling with personal issues for a long time do seek help, health workers often do not have the time (1or more hours) to listen to their stories. This makes individuals feel frustrated and uncared for. It also increases the risk of prolonged psychological distress and suicide ideation.Aim: To develop a community based, transferable and sustainable Aboriginal model for early identification and referral of people with psychological distress and suicidal ideation.Methods: The presentation will describe the rationale for, the development of and the usefulness of the Jekkora Model for the early identification of individuals showing signs of psychological distress or suicidal ideation. The model is built around a group of trained volunteers through a collaborative effort between the Social and emotional wellbeing service, the medical service and a mental health nurse.Results: The Jekkora model improves access to culturally appropriate support and care for those displaying signs of psychological distress in rural Aboriginal communities. It is a good example of a locally developed, replicable, culturally acceptable, problem specific and result oriented service that is both cost effective and sustainable.Conclusion: This model can be adapted for Indigenous peoples in other parts of the world

AB - Background: Aboriginal people and men in particular have difficulty seeking help for their mental health problems (1). Disclosing their problems or sharing it with others appears to be a major obstacle (2). When Aboriginal people who have been struggling with personal issues for a long time do seek help, health workers often do not have the time (1or more hours) to listen to their stories. This makes individuals feel frustrated and uncared for. It also increases the risk of prolonged psychological distress and suicide ideation.Aim: To develop a community based, transferable and sustainable Aboriginal model for early identification and referral of people with psychological distress and suicidal ideation.Methods: The presentation will describe the rationale for, the development of and the usefulness of the Jekkora Model for the early identification of individuals showing signs of psychological distress or suicidal ideation. The model is built around a group of trained volunteers through a collaborative effort between the Social and emotional wellbeing service, the medical service and a mental health nurse.Results: The Jekkora model improves access to culturally appropriate support and care for those displaying signs of psychological distress in rural Aboriginal communities. It is a good example of a locally developed, replicable, culturally acceptable, problem specific and result oriented service that is both cost effective and sustainable.Conclusion: This model can be adapted for Indigenous peoples in other parts of the world

M3 - Abstract

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Hearn S, Isaacs AN, Sutton K. The Jekkora model of early intervention for suicidal ideation and psychological distress among Aboriginal communities. 2016. Abstract from 17th Canadian Collaborative Mental Health Care Conference, Kelowna, B.C., Canada.