The ipsilateral corticospinal responses to cross-education are dependent upon the motor-training intervention

Michael Leung, Timo Rantalainen, Wei Peng Teo, Dawson Kidgell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to identify the ipsilateral corticospinal responses of the contralateral limb following different types of unilateral motor-training. Three groups performing unilateral slow-paced strength training (SPST), non-paced strength training (NPST) or visuomotor skill training (VT) were compared to a control group. It was hypothesised that 4 weeks of unilateral SPST and VT, but not NPST, would increase ipsilateral corticospinal excitability (CSE) and reduce short-interval cortical inhibition (SICI), resulting in greater performance gains of the untrained limb. Tracking error of the untrained limb reduced by 29 and 41% following 2 and 4 weeks of VT. Strength of the untrained limb increased by 8 and 16% following 2 and 4 weeks of SPST and by 6 and 13% following NPST. There was no difference in cross-education of strength or tracking error. For the trained limb, SPST and NPST increased strength (28 and 26%), and VT improved by 47 and 58%. SPST and VT increased ipsilateral CSE by 89 and 71% at 2 weeks. Ipsilateral CSE increased 105 and 81% at 4 weeks following SPST and VT. The NPST group and control group showed no changes at 2 and 4 weeks. SPST and VT reduced ipsilateral SICI by 45 and 47% at 2 weeks; at 4 weeks, SPST and VT reduced SICI by 48 and 38%. The ipsilateral corticospinal responses are determined by the type of motor-training. There were no differences in motor performance between SPST, NPST and VT. The data suggests that the corticospinal responses to cross-education are different and determined by the type of motor-training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1331-1346
Number of pages16
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume236
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2018

Keywords

  • Cortical inhibition
  • Corticospinal
  • Cross-education
  • Skill-training
  • Strength-training

Cite this

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title = "The ipsilateral corticospinal responses to cross-education are dependent upon the motor-training intervention",
abstract = "This study aimed to identify the ipsilateral corticospinal responses of the contralateral limb following different types of unilateral motor-training. Three groups performing unilateral slow-paced strength training (SPST), non-paced strength training (NPST) or visuomotor skill training (VT) were compared to a control group. It was hypothesised that 4 weeks of unilateral SPST and VT, but not NPST, would increase ipsilateral corticospinal excitability (CSE) and reduce short-interval cortical inhibition (SICI), resulting in greater performance gains of the untrained limb. Tracking error of the untrained limb reduced by 29 and 41{\%} following 2 and 4 weeks of VT. Strength of the untrained limb increased by 8 and 16{\%} following 2 and 4 weeks of SPST and by 6 and 13{\%} following NPST. There was no difference in cross-education of strength or tracking error. For the trained limb, SPST and NPST increased strength (28 and 26{\%}), and VT improved by 47 and 58{\%}. SPST and VT increased ipsilateral CSE by 89 and 71{\%} at 2 weeks. Ipsilateral CSE increased 105 and 81{\%} at 4 weeks following SPST and VT. The NPST group and control group showed no changes at 2 and 4 weeks. SPST and VT reduced ipsilateral SICI by 45 and 47{\%} at 2 weeks; at 4 weeks, SPST and VT reduced SICI by 48 and 38{\%}. The ipsilateral corticospinal responses are determined by the type of motor-training. There were no differences in motor performance between SPST, NPST and VT. The data suggests that the corticospinal responses to cross-education are different and determined by the type of motor-training.",
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The ipsilateral corticospinal responses to cross-education are dependent upon the motor-training intervention. / Leung, Michael; Rantalainen, Timo; Teo, Wei Peng; Kidgell, Dawson.

In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 236, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 1331-1346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Rantalainen, Timo

AU - Teo, Wei Peng

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AB - This study aimed to identify the ipsilateral corticospinal responses of the contralateral limb following different types of unilateral motor-training. Three groups performing unilateral slow-paced strength training (SPST), non-paced strength training (NPST) or visuomotor skill training (VT) were compared to a control group. It was hypothesised that 4 weeks of unilateral SPST and VT, but not NPST, would increase ipsilateral corticospinal excitability (CSE) and reduce short-interval cortical inhibition (SICI), resulting in greater performance gains of the untrained limb. Tracking error of the untrained limb reduced by 29 and 41% following 2 and 4 weeks of VT. Strength of the untrained limb increased by 8 and 16% following 2 and 4 weeks of SPST and by 6 and 13% following NPST. There was no difference in cross-education of strength or tracking error. For the trained limb, SPST and NPST increased strength (28 and 26%), and VT improved by 47 and 58%. SPST and VT increased ipsilateral CSE by 89 and 71% at 2 weeks. Ipsilateral CSE increased 105 and 81% at 4 weeks following SPST and VT. The NPST group and control group showed no changes at 2 and 4 weeks. SPST and VT reduced ipsilateral SICI by 45 and 47% at 2 weeks; at 4 weeks, SPST and VT reduced SICI by 48 and 38%. The ipsilateral corticospinal responses are determined by the type of motor-training. There were no differences in motor performance between SPST, NPST and VT. The data suggests that the corticospinal responses to cross-education are different and determined by the type of motor-training.

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KW - Corticospinal

KW - Cross-education

KW - Skill-training

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