THE INFLUENCE OF ELECTRICAL ANISOTROPY ON MISE À LA MASSE SURVEYS

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Abstract

In a transversely electrically anisotropic rock mass of arbitrary dip, the potential distribution about an electrode at arbitrary depth is the sum of the whole‐space potential about that electrode, plus the whole‐space potential about a postulated image electrode displaced up‐dip from the source position. Equipotential lines on the rock‐air surface are ellipses, elongated parallel to strike, and with centers displaced up‐dip from the surface projection of the electrode position. In metamorphosed rocks frequently encountered in mining geophysics, anisotropy is such that elongation is most marked in steeply dipping rocks, with displacement most evident in low to moderate dip. Graphs relating the anisotropy coefficient to displacement and elongation assist in separation of the anisotropy‐related effects from those of a significant subsurface conductive body, particularly if surface resistivity sounding establishes the coefficient of anisotropy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-245
Number of pages8
JournalGeophysical Prospecting
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1974
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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title = "THE INFLUENCE OF ELECTRICAL ANISOTROPY ON MISE {\`A} LA MASSE SURVEYS",
abstract = "In a transversely electrically anisotropic rock mass of arbitrary dip, the potential distribution about an electrode at arbitrary depth is the sum of the whole‐space potential about that electrode, plus the whole‐space potential about a postulated image electrode displaced up‐dip from the source position. Equipotential lines on the rock‐air surface are ellipses, elongated parallel to strike, and with centers displaced up‐dip from the surface projection of the electrode position. In metamorphosed rocks frequently encountered in mining geophysics, anisotropy is such that elongation is most marked in steeply dipping rocks, with displacement most evident in low to moderate dip. Graphs relating the anisotropy coefficient to displacement and elongation assist in separation of the anisotropy‐related effects from those of a significant subsurface conductive body, particularly if surface resistivity sounding establishes the coefficient of anisotropy.",
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THE INFLUENCE OF ELECTRICAL ANISOTROPY ON MISE À LA MASSE SURVEYS. / ASTEN, M. W.

In: Geophysical Prospecting, Vol. 22, No. 2, 1974, p. 238-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - THE INFLUENCE OF ELECTRICAL ANISOTROPY ON MISE À LA MASSE SURVEYS

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AB - In a transversely electrically anisotropic rock mass of arbitrary dip, the potential distribution about an electrode at arbitrary depth is the sum of the whole‐space potential about that electrode, plus the whole‐space potential about a postulated image electrode displaced up‐dip from the source position. Equipotential lines on the rock‐air surface are ellipses, elongated parallel to strike, and with centers displaced up‐dip from the surface projection of the electrode position. In metamorphosed rocks frequently encountered in mining geophysics, anisotropy is such that elongation is most marked in steeply dipping rocks, with displacement most evident in low to moderate dip. Graphs relating the anisotropy coefficient to displacement and elongation assist in separation of the anisotropy‐related effects from those of a significant subsurface conductive body, particularly if surface resistivity sounding establishes the coefficient of anisotropy.

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