The impact of road traffic injury in North India

A mixed-methods study protocol

Jagnoor Jagnoor, Shankar Prinja, P.V.M. Lakshmi, Sameer Aggarwal, Belinda Jane Gabbe, Rebecca Ivers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Road traffic injuries are a large and growing public health burden, especially in low and middle income countries where 90% of the world’s deaths due to road traffic injuries are estimated to occur. India is one of the fastest growing economies,with rapid motorisation and increasing road traffic burden. However, there are limited data addressing the problem of non-fatal road traffic injuries, with existing data being of poor quality, non-representative and difficult to access, and encompassing a limited number of relevant variables. This study aims to determine the outcomes of road traffic injuries on function and health-related quality of life, to assess their social impact and to weigh the economic cost of road traffic crashes in an urban setting in India. Methods and analysis: This prospective observational study will recruit approximately 1500 participants injured in road traffic crashes, who are admitted to hospital for >24 h at any of three participating hospitals in Chandigarh, India. Face-to face baseline interviews will be conducted by telephone at 1, 2, 4 and 12 months post injury. Standardised tools will be used to collect data on health and social outcomes, and on the economic impact of road traffic crashes. Descriptive analysis and multivariate models will be used to report outcome data and associations.The qualitative in-depth interviews will be analysed thematically using content analysis. This study will provide the first comprehensive estimates on outcomes of serious road traffic injury in India, including economic and social costs, and the impact on individuals and families. Ethics and dissemination: Primary ethics approval was received from the Postgraduate Institute for Medical Education and Research, institute’s ethics committee, Chandigarh, India. Results will be disseminated via the usual scientific forums including peer-reviewed publications and presentations at international conferences.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere008884
Pages (from-to)1 - 6
Number of pages6
JournalBMJ Open
Volume5
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

Jagnoor, J., Prinja, S., Lakshmi, P. V. M., Aggarwal, S., Gabbe, B. J., & Ivers, R. (2015). The impact of road traffic injury in North India: A mixed-methods study protocol. BMJ Open, 5(8), 1 - 6. [e008884]. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008884
Jagnoor, Jagnoor ; Prinja, Shankar ; Lakshmi, P.V.M. ; Aggarwal, Sameer ; Gabbe, Belinda Jane ; Ivers, Rebecca. / The impact of road traffic injury in North India : A mixed-methods study protocol. In: BMJ Open. 2015 ; Vol. 5, No. 8. pp. 1 - 6.
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Jagnoor, J, Prinja, S, Lakshmi, PVM, Aggarwal, S, Gabbe, BJ & Ivers, R 2015, 'The impact of road traffic injury in North India: A mixed-methods study protocol', BMJ Open, vol. 5, no. 8, e008884, pp. 1 - 6. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008884

The impact of road traffic injury in North India : A mixed-methods study protocol. / Jagnoor, Jagnoor; Prinja, Shankar; Lakshmi, P.V.M.; Aggarwal, Sameer; Gabbe, Belinda Jane; Ivers, Rebecca.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 5, No. 8, e008884, 2015, p. 1 - 6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleOtherpeer-review

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