The Impact of Human Papillomavirus Catch-Up Vaccination in Australia: Implications for Introduction of Multiple Age Cohort Vaccination and Postvaccination Data Interpretation

Mélanie Drolet, Jean François Laprise, Julia M.L. Brotherton, Basil Donovan, Christopher K. Fairley, Hammad Ali, Élodie Bénard, Dave Martin, Marc Brisson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We used transmission-dynamic modeling to estimate the added effectiveness of vaccinating multiple cohorts of females (12-26 years) in Australia compared with the theoretical introduction of routine-only (12-13 years) vaccination. Our results suggest that vaccinating multiple cohorts produced markedly faster direct/herd effects, and it added benefits that last for 20-70 years. Furthermore, the number needed to vaccinate to prevent 1 anogential warts (AGW) case or cervical cancer (CC) was similar for routine + catch-up (AGW = 9.9, CC = 678) and routine-only vaccination (AGW = 9.9, CC = 677), thus providing similar levels of efficiency per person vaccinated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1205-1209
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume216
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • anogenital warts
  • cervical cancers
  • human papillomavirus
  • mathematical modeling
  • vaccination

Cite this

Drolet, Mélanie ; Laprise, Jean François ; Brotherton, Julia M.L. ; Donovan, Basil ; Fairley, Christopher K. ; Ali, Hammad ; Bénard, Élodie ; Martin, Dave ; Brisson, Marc. / The Impact of Human Papillomavirus Catch-Up Vaccination in Australia : Implications for Introduction of Multiple Age Cohort Vaccination and Postvaccination Data Interpretation. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2017 ; Vol. 216, No. 10. pp. 1205-1209.
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abstract = "We used transmission-dynamic modeling to estimate the added effectiveness of vaccinating multiple cohorts of females (12-26 years) in Australia compared with the theoretical introduction of routine-only (12-13 years) vaccination. Our results suggest that vaccinating multiple cohorts produced markedly faster direct/herd effects, and it added benefits that last for 20-70 years. Furthermore, the number needed to vaccinate to prevent 1 anogential warts (AGW) case or cervical cancer (CC) was similar for routine + catch-up (AGW = 9.9, CC = 678) and routine-only vaccination (AGW = 9.9, CC = 677), thus providing similar levels of efficiency per person vaccinated.",
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The Impact of Human Papillomavirus Catch-Up Vaccination in Australia : Implications for Introduction of Multiple Age Cohort Vaccination and Postvaccination Data Interpretation. / Drolet, Mélanie; Laprise, Jean François; Brotherton, Julia M.L.; Donovan, Basil; Fairley, Christopher K.; Ali, Hammad; Bénard, Élodie; Martin, Dave; Brisson, Marc.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 216, No. 10, 05.12.2017, p. 1205-1209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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