The gender imbalance in Interventional Radiology in Australia and New Zealand

Heather K. Moriarty, Warren Clements, Adil Zia, Brigid Connor, Gerard S. Goh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: There are few female Interventional Radiologists worldwide and this is a significant issue for many countries. There is little known about the current status and attitudes to women in Interventional Radiology in Australia and New Zealand. The purpose of this study was to explore the gender balance, workforce challenges and perceptions towards women in Interventional Radiology in Australia and New Zealand. Methods: An anonymised voluntary survey exploring the current demographics of Interventional Radiologists and opinions on multiple gender issues in Interventional Radiology was conducted. The survey was sent to all members of the Interventional Radiology Society of Australasia. Statistical analysis was performed using independent samples t-tests, the non-parametric Mann–Whitney U testing and proportions of binary variables using logistic regression. Results: Seventy seven responses were received, 83% males and 17% females. The majority of participants worked full time (83%) and identified as an Interventional Radiologist with/without some sessions of diagnostic radiology per week (83%). There was general consensus in many issues; however, males tended to disagree more than females that female IRs are treated differently than male IRs (p < 0.037), and that male IRs are paid more than female IRs (P = 0.020). Females agreed it was harder for female IRs to gain academic or clinical promotion; however, males disagreed (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There is a clear gender imbalance in Interventional Radiology in Australia and New Zealand. Multiple issues should be investigated and addressed by the major stakeholders such as the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists and the Interventional Radiology society of Australasia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)146-154
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2023

Keywords

  • gender
  • interventional radiology
  • politics (medical/radiological)
  • radiology
  • workforce

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