The first wave of modern clinical legal education: The United States, Britain, Canada, and Australia

Jeffrey Michael Giddings, Burridge Burridge, Shelley A. M. Gavigan, Catherine Klein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter considers the early development of clinical legal education in a group of countries that have proven influential in the spread of clinical methods across the globe: the United States, Britain, Canada, and Australia. There are both similarities and differences in the stories of how clinics emerged during the 1960s and 1970s with volunteer-based student services developing into academic programs that pursued both social justice and student learning objectives while emphasizing ethics and professional responsibility. The points of contrast relate to the academic-professional divide in British and Australian legal education, accreditation requirements, funding arrangements, and the treatment of clinicians in the legal academy. The chapter also considers the lasting legacy of these early programs, suggesting that the distinctiveness of clinical legal education is a source of both strength and vulnerability.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Global Clinical Movement
Subtitle of host publicationEducating Lawyers for Social Justice
EditorsFrank Bloch
Place of PublicationNew York NY USA
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages3-22
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9780199869305
ISBN (Print)9780195381146
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Britain
  • Canada
  • Clinical methods
  • Clinicians
  • Ethics
  • Professional responsibility
  • Social justice
  • United states

Cite this

Giddings, J. M., Burridge, B., Gavigan, S. A. M., & Klein, C. (2011). The first wave of modern clinical legal education: The United States, Britain, Canada, and Australia. In F. Bloch (Ed.), The Global Clinical Movement: Educating Lawyers for Social Justice (pp. 3-22). New York NY USA: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.003.0001
Giddings, Jeffrey Michael ; Burridge, Burridge ; Gavigan, Shelley A. M. ; Klein, Catherine. / The first wave of modern clinical legal education : The United States, Britain, Canada, and Australia. The Global Clinical Movement: Educating Lawyers for Social Justice. editor / Frank Bloch. New York NY USA : Oxford University Press, 2011. pp. 3-22
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Giddings, JM, Burridge, B, Gavigan, SAM & Klein, C 2011, The first wave of modern clinical legal education: The United States, Britain, Canada, and Australia. in F Bloch (ed.), The Global Clinical Movement: Educating Lawyers for Social Justice. Oxford University Press, New York NY USA, pp. 3-22. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.003.0001

The first wave of modern clinical legal education : The United States, Britain, Canada, and Australia. / Giddings, Jeffrey Michael; Burridge, Burridge; Gavigan, Shelley A. M. ; Klein, Catherine.

The Global Clinical Movement: Educating Lawyers for Social Justice. ed. / Frank Bloch. New York NY USA : Oxford University Press, 2011. p. 3-22.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

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Giddings JM, Burridge B, Gavigan SAM, Klein C. The first wave of modern clinical legal education: The United States, Britain, Canada, and Australia. In Bloch F, editor, The Global Clinical Movement: Educating Lawyers for Social Justice. New York NY USA: Oxford University Press. 2011. p. 3-22 https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.003.0001