The escapologist: Possible equivalences in a cat-and-mouse game

Research output: Contribution to journalShort ReviewOther

Abstract

In order to grasp the complexity of allusions in J.M. Coetzee's new novel, The Schooldays of Jesus, you need to have your wits about you. On the other hand, as with its prequel, The Childhood of Jesus (2013), the novel may also be read fairly simply, as a fable. As a sequel to the first 'Jesus' novel, it progresses the story of Simón, Inés, and David, the 'holy family,' as they continue their journey, with their dog Bolívar, from the town named Novilla to a new town, Estrella, meaning 'star' in Spanish, in an unspecified Spanish-speaking country.'
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-30
Number of pages3
JournalAustralian Book Review
Volume385
Issue numberOctober 2016
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

Keywords

  • J,M.Coetzee
  • The Schooldays of Jesus

Cite this

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title = "The escapologist:: Possible equivalences in a cat-and-mouse game",
abstract = "In order to grasp the complexity of allusions in J.M. Coetzee's new novel, The Schooldays of Jesus, you need to have your wits about you. On the other hand, as with its prequel, The Childhood of Jesus (2013), the novel may also be read fairly simply, as a fable. As a sequel to the first 'Jesus' novel, it progresses the story of Sim{\'o}n, In{\'e}s, and David, the 'holy family,' as they continue their journey, with their dog Bol{\'i}var, from the town named Novilla to a new town, Estrella, meaning 'star' in Spanish, in an unspecified Spanish-speaking country.'",
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author = "Sue Kossew",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
language = "English",
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pages = "29--30",
journal = "Australian Book Review",
issn = "0155-2864",
number = "October 2016",

}

The escapologist: Possible equivalences in a cat-and-mouse game . / Kossew, Sue.

In: Australian Book Review, Vol. 385, No. October 2016, 10.2016, p. 29-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort ReviewOther

TY - JOUR

T1 - The escapologist:

T2 - Possible equivalences in a cat-and-mouse game

AU - Kossew, Sue

PY - 2016/10

Y1 - 2016/10

N2 - In order to grasp the complexity of allusions in J.M. Coetzee's new novel, The Schooldays of Jesus, you need to have your wits about you. On the other hand, as with its prequel, The Childhood of Jesus (2013), the novel may also be read fairly simply, as a fable. As a sequel to the first 'Jesus' novel, it progresses the story of Simón, Inés, and David, the 'holy family,' as they continue their journey, with their dog Bolívar, from the town named Novilla to a new town, Estrella, meaning 'star' in Spanish, in an unspecified Spanish-speaking country.'

AB - In order to grasp the complexity of allusions in J.M. Coetzee's new novel, The Schooldays of Jesus, you need to have your wits about you. On the other hand, as with its prequel, The Childhood of Jesus (2013), the novel may also be read fairly simply, as a fable. As a sequel to the first 'Jesus' novel, it progresses the story of Simón, Inés, and David, the 'holy family,' as they continue their journey, with their dog Bolívar, from the town named Novilla to a new town, Estrella, meaning 'star' in Spanish, in an unspecified Spanish-speaking country.'

KW - J,M.Coetzee

KW - The Schooldays of Jesus

M3 - Short Review

VL - 385

SP - 29

EP - 30

JO - Australian Book Review

JF - Australian Book Review

SN - 0155-2864

IS - October 2016

ER -