The effects of binge and problem drinking on problem behavior and adjustment over the life course: findings from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development

Wesley G. Jennings, Alex R. Piquero, Michael Rocque, David P. Farrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Prior research has documented linkages between alcohol use and crime and drinking and adverse life circumstances, but this evidence has largely been gleaned from cross-sectional studies or studies conducted over brief time periods. Methods: In recognition of these limitations, the current study relies on prospective longitudinal data from 411 South London males who are participants in the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development (CSDD) to evaluate the prevalence of binge and problem drinking typologies (e.g., juvenile only, adult only, and juvenile and adult binge and problem drinking; ages 18-48) and the relationship of these typologies to non-violent and violent offending over the life-course (e.g., ever convicted for either a non-violent and/or violent offense over ages 10-50) and adult adjustment problems into late middle age. Results: Results suggest that binge and problem drinking typologies are significantly related to both forms of offending and that these drinking behaviors are associated with a number of adult adjustment problems into late middle age, particularly for adult only and juvenile and adult binge and problem drinkers. Conclusions: The findings highlight the importance of evidenced-based alcohol prevention and intervention efforts initiated early on in the life-course.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-463
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume43
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015
Externally publishedYes

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