The effect of upper pontine transections on normal cochlear responses and on the protective effects of contralateral acoustic stimulation in barbiturate-anaesthetized normal-hearing guinea pigs

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Abstract

In barbiturate-anaesthetized guinea pigs with normal cochlear neural sensitivities, upper pontine transections were made to totally isolate the cell bodies of the olivocochlear neurons in the lower brainstem from all higher centres. The effects of this procedure were examined at the cochlea on normal compound action potential (CAP) thresholds and amplitudes, on the temporary threshold shifts (TTS) in CAP sensitivity caused by monaural loud sound exposures, and on the protective effects of low-level contralateral acoustic stimulation (Cody and Johnstone, 1982; Rajan and Johnstone, 1983a, 1988). The transection had no effects on any of these responses. These results suggest that centres above the metencephalon do not exert any tonic effects on the cell bodies of the olivocochlear pathways that result in tonic effects at the cochlea. Further, these results also suggest that the protective effects of contralateral acoustic stimulation are exercised solely through lower brainstem pathways.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-144
Number of pages8
JournalHearing Research
Volume45
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1990
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Auditory
  • Cochlea
  • Descending influences
  • Olivocochlear
  • Pontine transection

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