The effect of bullying on burnout in nurses: The moderating role of psychological detachment

Belinda Allen, Peter Jeffrey Holland, Roslyn Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between bullying and burnout and the potential buffering effect psychological detachment might have on this relationship. Background: There is evidence to suggest that bullying is relatively widespread in the nursing profession, with previous studies indicating that bullying is associated with higher levels of burnout. There is, however, limited research focusing on potential moderators of the relationship between bullying and burnout. Design: A cross-sectional quantitative study conducted with self-completed, anonymous questionnaires. Methods: The study was conducted in 2011 with 762 Registered Nurses in Australia. Two hypotheses were tested with validated measures of bullying, psychological detachment and burnout. The hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression. Results: Bullying is positively associated with burnout. Psychological detachment does not significantly moderate the relationship between bullying and burnout. Conclusion: The results indicate that bullying exacts a strong negative toll on nurses. Ensuring there are workplace policies and practices in place in healthcare organizations to reduce the instances of bullying and proactively address it when it does occur would therefore seem crucial. Individuals may also lower their risk of burning out by psychologically detaching from work.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381 - 390
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume71
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

Allen, Belinda ; Holland, Peter Jeffrey ; Reynolds, Roslyn. / The effect of bullying on burnout in nurses: The moderating role of psychological detachment. In: Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2015 ; Vol. 71, No. 2. pp. 381 - 390.
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The effect of bullying on burnout in nurses: The moderating role of psychological detachment. / Allen, Belinda; Holland, Peter Jeffrey; Reynolds, Roslyn.

In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 71, No. 2, 2015, p. 381 - 390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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