The diagnostic accuracy of brief screening questions for psychosocial risk factors of poor outcome from an episode of pain a systematic review

Saeida Mirkhil, Peter Michael Kent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of brief screening questions for psychosocial risk factors predictive of poor outcome from an episode of pain. Methods: Six electronic databases were searched, content experts contacted, and reference and citation tracking performed. Studies were included that examined the diagnostic accuracy of 1-item screening or 2-item screening questions for depression, anxiety, fear-avoidance beliefs, social isolation, catastrophization, or somatization and were published in English. Studies were assessed for quality, and data extracted describing study characteristics and the diagnostic accuracy of brief screening questions. Results: Four cross-sectional studies met the inclusion criteria and all met 4 or more of our 6 method quality criteria. These studies examined the diagnostic accuracy of brief screening tools for depression (sensitivity = 50.5 to 82.1 , specificity = 71.0 to 90.6 , and overall accuracy = 74.6 to 80.6 ) and anxiety (sensitivity 63.0 to 94.0 , specificity = 53.0 to 71.2 , and overall accuracy = 60.0 to 68.1 ). No studies were identified that examined the diagnostic accuracy of brief screening questions for fear-avoidance beliefs, social isolation, catastrophization, and somatization. Discussion: Data were only available on the accuracy of brief screening instruments for depression and anxiety, and there was variability in the results. Head-to-head studies are required to determine if this variability reflects differential question accuracy or population characteristics, and studies that determine the diagnostic accuracy of brief screening questions for other common psychosocial risk factors would be useful.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)340 - 348
Number of pages9
JournalThe Clinical Journal of Pain
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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