The development and implementation of a clinical skills matrix to plan and monitor palliative care nurses' skills

Hanan Khalil, Anny Byrne, Eli Ristevski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To develop and implement a region wide skills matrix for palliative care and district nurses in rural Victoria in order to identify and address individual learning needs and appropriate professional development strategies based on the Australian National Palliative Care Standards. This study is the first in a series of papers discussing and evaluating the development and implementation of a skills matrix. Future papers will report on participants’ data reporting. Methods: The development and implementation of a skills matrix for palliative care nurses was based on using several evidence-based strategies involving four main stages. There were: stakeholder consultation, collaboration, consolidation and implementation. The initial stage of development of the matrix involved consultation with regional stakeholders to establish and refine the project objectives. The second stage involved collection of information from regional stakeholders; brainstorming and discussion of the technical skills required for palliative care and the cross over with district nursing. The third stage involved a facilitated process whereby action plans were devised and the final stage involved a plan for the survey dissemination and evaluation of the training needs. Other evidence-based strategies used were Benner's theoretical model of clinical competence, the Australian National Palliative Care Standards and the triple C model of project implementation. Results: This study reported on the development and implementation of a self-assessment of competencies skills matrix for nurses working in palliative care based on the Australian National Standards of palliative care used by services. The matrix included all the aspects covered by the Australian National Palliative Care Standards and mapped them to various competencies using Benner's model ranging from novice to expert. The availability of a skills matrix tool to self-assess is important to keep track of the clinical competencies gained by palliative care nurses. Targeted educational interventions identified by the skills matrix have the potential to improve quality of care provided in the palliative care setting. Conclusion: The successful development and implementation of the palliative skills matrix across the Gippsland region relied on using several evidence-based strategies to standardise the competencies across the palliative care setting in rural Victoria, Australia. Examples of these strategies included using Benner's theoretical competency model, the Australian National Palliative Standards and the triple C model, which included stakeholders’ consultation, collaboration and consolidation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)634-639
Number of pages6
JournalCollegian
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Benner's model
  • competencies
  • hospice and palliative care nursing
  • palliative care
  • Skills matrix

Cite this