The Crohn’s & Colitis Australia Inflammatory Bowel Disease Audit: Measuring the quality of care in Australia

Wayne Massuger, Gregory TC Moore, Jane M Andrews, Monique Kilkenny, Megan Reyneke, Simon Knowles, Liz Purcell, George Alex, Stephanie Buckton, Amy Theresa Page, Nigel Stocks, Donald Cameron, Francesca Manglaviti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To audit the quality of care received by patients admitted for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) across Australia against national IBD Standards.
Design: Retrospective cross‐sectional survey and clinical audit assessing organisational resources, clinical processes and outcome measures.
Setting: Australian hospitals.
Participants: Hospitals that care for inpatients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.
Main outcome measures: Adherence to national IBD Standards and comparison of quality of care between hospitals with and without multidisciplinary IBD services.
Results: 71 hospitals completed the organisational survey. Only one hospital had a complete multidisciplinary IBD service and 17 had a Partial IBD Service (IBD nurse, helpline and clinical lead). 1440 inpatient records were reviewed from 52 hospitals (mean age 37 years; 51% female, 53% Crohn’s disease), approximately 26% of IBD inpatient episodes over a 12‐month period in Australia. These patients were chronically unwell with high rates of anaemia (30%) and frequent readmissions (40% within two years). In general, care was inconsistent, and documentation poor. Hospitals with a Partial IBD Service performed better in many process and outcome measures: for example, 22% reduction in admissions via emergency departments and greater adherence to standards for safety monitoring of biologic (89% vs 59%) and immunosuppressive drugs (79% vs 55%) in those hospitals than those without.
Conclusions: Patients admitted to hospital suffering from IBD are young, chronically unwell, and are subject to substantial variations in clinical documentation and quality of care. Only one hospital met accepted Standards for multidisciplinary care; hospitals with even a minimal IBD service provided improved care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalInternal Medicine Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

Cite this

Massuger, Wayne ; Moore, Gregory TC ; Andrews, Jane M ; Kilkenny, Monique ; Reyneke, Megan ; Knowles, Simon ; Purcell, Liz ; Alex, George ; Buckton, Stephanie ; Page, Amy Theresa ; Stocks, Nigel ; Cameron, Donald ; Manglaviti, Francesca. / The Crohn’s & Colitis Australia Inflammatory Bowel Disease Audit: Measuring the quality of care in Australia. In: Internal Medicine Journal. 2019 ; pp. 1-21.
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title = "The Crohn’s & Colitis Australia Inflammatory Bowel Disease Audit: Measuring the quality of care in Australia",
abstract = "Objectives: To audit the quality of care received by patients admitted for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) across Australia against national IBD Standards.Design: Retrospective cross‐sectional survey and clinical audit assessing organisational resources, clinical processes and outcome measures.Setting: Australian hospitals.Participants: Hospitals that care for inpatients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.Main outcome measures: Adherence to national IBD Standards and comparison of quality of care between hospitals with and without multidisciplinary IBD services.Results: 71 hospitals completed the organisational survey. Only one hospital had a complete multidisciplinary IBD service and 17 had a Partial IBD Service (IBD nurse, helpline and clinical lead). 1440 inpatient records were reviewed from 52 hospitals (mean age 37 years; 51{\%} female, 53{\%} Crohn’s disease), approximately 26{\%} of IBD inpatient episodes over a 12‐month period in Australia. These patients were chronically unwell with high rates of anaemia (30{\%}) and frequent readmissions (40{\%} within two years). In general, care was inconsistent, and documentation poor. Hospitals with a Partial IBD Service performed better in many process and outcome measures: for example, 22{\%} reduction in admissions via emergency departments and greater adherence to standards for safety monitoring of biologic (89{\%} vs 59{\%}) and immunosuppressive drugs (79{\%} vs 55{\%}) in those hospitals than those without.Conclusions: Patients admitted to hospital suffering from IBD are young, chronically unwell, and are subject to substantial variations in clinical documentation and quality of care. Only one hospital met accepted Standards for multidisciplinary care; hospitals with even a minimal IBD service provided improved care.",
author = "Wayne Massuger and Moore, {Gregory TC} and Andrews, {Jane M} and Monique Kilkenny and Megan Reyneke and Simon Knowles and Liz Purcell and George Alex and Stephanie Buckton and Page, {Amy Theresa} and Nigel Stocks and Donald Cameron and Francesca Manglaviti",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1111/imj.14187",
language = "English",
pages = "1--21",
journal = "Internal Medicine Journal",
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publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

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Massuger, W, Moore, GTC, Andrews, JM, Kilkenny, M, Reyneke, M, Knowles, S, Purcell, L, Alex, G, Buckton, S, Page, AT, Stocks, N, Cameron, D & Manglaviti, F 2019, 'The Crohn’s & Colitis Australia Inflammatory Bowel Disease Audit: Measuring the quality of care in Australia' Internal Medicine Journal, pp. 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1111/imj.14187

The Crohn’s & Colitis Australia Inflammatory Bowel Disease Audit: Measuring the quality of care in Australia. / Massuger, Wayne; Moore, Gregory TC ; Andrews, Jane M; Kilkenny, Monique; Reyneke, Megan; Knowles, Simon; Purcell, Liz; Alex, George; Buckton, Stephanie; Page, Amy Theresa; Stocks, Nigel; Cameron, Donald; Manglaviti, Francesca.

In: Internal Medicine Journal, 2019, p. 1-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - The Crohn’s & Colitis Australia Inflammatory Bowel Disease Audit: Measuring the quality of care in Australia

AU - Massuger, Wayne

AU - Moore, Gregory TC

AU - Andrews, Jane M

AU - Kilkenny, Monique

AU - Reyneke, Megan

AU - Knowles, Simon

AU - Purcell, Liz

AU - Alex, George

AU - Buckton, Stephanie

AU - Page, Amy Theresa

AU - Stocks, Nigel

AU - Cameron, Donald

AU - Manglaviti, Francesca

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objectives: To audit the quality of care received by patients admitted for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) across Australia against national IBD Standards.Design: Retrospective cross‐sectional survey and clinical audit assessing organisational resources, clinical processes and outcome measures.Setting: Australian hospitals.Participants: Hospitals that care for inpatients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.Main outcome measures: Adherence to national IBD Standards and comparison of quality of care between hospitals with and without multidisciplinary IBD services.Results: 71 hospitals completed the organisational survey. Only one hospital had a complete multidisciplinary IBD service and 17 had a Partial IBD Service (IBD nurse, helpline and clinical lead). 1440 inpatient records were reviewed from 52 hospitals (mean age 37 years; 51% female, 53% Crohn’s disease), approximately 26% of IBD inpatient episodes over a 12‐month period in Australia. These patients were chronically unwell with high rates of anaemia (30%) and frequent readmissions (40% within two years). In general, care was inconsistent, and documentation poor. Hospitals with a Partial IBD Service performed better in many process and outcome measures: for example, 22% reduction in admissions via emergency departments and greater adherence to standards for safety monitoring of biologic (89% vs 59%) and immunosuppressive drugs (79% vs 55%) in those hospitals than those without.Conclusions: Patients admitted to hospital suffering from IBD are young, chronically unwell, and are subject to substantial variations in clinical documentation and quality of care. Only one hospital met accepted Standards for multidisciplinary care; hospitals with even a minimal IBD service provided improved care.

AB - Objectives: To audit the quality of care received by patients admitted for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) across Australia against national IBD Standards.Design: Retrospective cross‐sectional survey and clinical audit assessing organisational resources, clinical processes and outcome measures.Setting: Australian hospitals.Participants: Hospitals that care for inpatients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.Main outcome measures: Adherence to national IBD Standards and comparison of quality of care between hospitals with and without multidisciplinary IBD services.Results: 71 hospitals completed the organisational survey. Only one hospital had a complete multidisciplinary IBD service and 17 had a Partial IBD Service (IBD nurse, helpline and clinical lead). 1440 inpatient records were reviewed from 52 hospitals (mean age 37 years; 51% female, 53% Crohn’s disease), approximately 26% of IBD inpatient episodes over a 12‐month period in Australia. These patients were chronically unwell with high rates of anaemia (30%) and frequent readmissions (40% within two years). In general, care was inconsistent, and documentation poor. Hospitals with a Partial IBD Service performed better in many process and outcome measures: for example, 22% reduction in admissions via emergency departments and greater adherence to standards for safety monitoring of biologic (89% vs 59%) and immunosuppressive drugs (79% vs 55%) in those hospitals than those without.Conclusions: Patients admitted to hospital suffering from IBD are young, chronically unwell, and are subject to substantial variations in clinical documentation and quality of care. Only one hospital met accepted Standards for multidisciplinary care; hospitals with even a minimal IBD service provided improved care.

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JO - Internal Medicine Journal

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SN - 1444-0903

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