The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent memory: a pharmacology study

Sara C Mednick, Elizabeth A McDevitt, James K Walsh, Erin J Wamsley, Martin P Paulus, Jennifer C Kanady, Sean Patrick Andrews Drummond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

An important function of sleep is the consolidation of memories, and features of sleep, such as rapid eye movement (REM) or sleep spindles, have been shown to correlate with improvements in discrete memory domains. Because of the methodological difficulties in modulating sleep, however, a causal link between specific sleep features and human memory consolidation is lacking. Here, we experimentally manipulated specific sleep features during a daytime nap via direct pharmacological intervention. Using zolpidem (Ambien), a short-acting GABAA agonist hypnotic, we show increased sleep spindle density and decreased REM sleep compared with placebo and sodium oxybate (Xyrem). Naps with increased spindles produced significantly better verbal memory and significantly worse perceptual learning but did not affect motor learning. The experimental spindles were similar to control spindles in amplitude and frequency, suggesting that the experimental intervention enhanced normal sleep processes. Furthermore, using statistical methods, we demonstrate for the first time a critical role of spindles in human hippocampal memory performance. The gains in memory consolidation exceed sleep-alone or control conditions and demonstrate the potential for targeted, exceptional memory enhancement in healthy adults with pharmacologically modified sleep
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4494 - 4504
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume33
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Mednick, S. C., McDevitt, E. A., Walsh, J. K., Wamsley, E. J., Paulus, M. P., Kanady, J. C., & Drummond, S. P. A. (2013). The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent memory: a pharmacology study. Journal of Neuroscience, 33(10), 4494 - 4504. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3127-12.2013
Mednick, Sara C ; McDevitt, Elizabeth A ; Walsh, James K ; Wamsley, Erin J ; Paulus, Martin P ; Kanady, Jennifer C ; Drummond, Sean Patrick Andrews. / The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent memory: a pharmacology study. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2013 ; Vol. 33, No. 10. pp. 4494 - 4504.
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abstract = "An important function of sleep is the consolidation of memories, and features of sleep, such as rapid eye movement (REM) or sleep spindles, have been shown to correlate with improvements in discrete memory domains. Because of the methodological difficulties in modulating sleep, however, a causal link between specific sleep features and human memory consolidation is lacking. Here, we experimentally manipulated specific sleep features during a daytime nap via direct pharmacological intervention. Using zolpidem (Ambien), a short-acting GABAA agonist hypnotic, we show increased sleep spindle density and decreased REM sleep compared with placebo and sodium oxybate (Xyrem). Naps with increased spindles produced significantly better verbal memory and significantly worse perceptual learning but did not affect motor learning. The experimental spindles were similar to control spindles in amplitude and frequency, suggesting that the experimental intervention enhanced normal sleep processes. Furthermore, using statistical methods, we demonstrate for the first time a critical role of spindles in human hippocampal memory performance. The gains in memory consolidation exceed sleep-alone or control conditions and demonstrate the potential for targeted, exceptional memory enhancement in healthy adults with pharmacologically modified sleep",
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Mednick, SC, McDevitt, EA, Walsh, JK, Wamsley, EJ, Paulus, MP, Kanady, JC & Drummond, SPA 2013, 'The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent memory: a pharmacology study', Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 33, no. 10, pp. 4494 - 4504. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3127-12.2013

The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent memory: a pharmacology study. / Mednick, Sara C; McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Walsh, James K; Wamsley, Erin J; Paulus, Martin P; Kanady, Jennifer C; Drummond, Sean Patrick Andrews.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 33, No. 10, 2013, p. 4494 - 4504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Kanady, Jennifer C

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