The contribution of demoralization to end of life decisionmaking

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Some psychiatrists believe that "demoralization syndrome" is a diagnosable cognitive disorder characterized in its extreme form by morbid existential distress. If they are right, then it should be an important part of our thinking about end of life decisionmaking. A demoralized patient would be unable to think reliably about the remainder of her life, and therefore incompetent to decide to commit physician-assisted suicide.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-31
Number of pages11
JournalHastings Center Report
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2004

Cite this

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The contribution of demoralization to end of life decisionmaking. / Klssane, David W.

In: Hastings Center Report, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.07.2004, p. 21-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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