The Bawdwin Mine, Myanmar: A review of its geological setting and genesis

Nicholas J. Gardiner, Laurence J. Robb, Michael P. Searle, Kyi Htun, Khin Zaw

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Bawdwin Mine, a Pb–Zn–(Cu–Ag–Ni) deposit sited in the northern Shan States, is probably the most famous historical mine in Myanmar. One of several world-class mineral deposits within the country, it has seen near-continuous mining since the early 1400s to the present for a range of commodities including: silver, lead, zinc, copper and nickel. Originally exploited as a silver deposit (Bawdwin is derived from baw, the Shan word for silver and literally means ‘silver mine’), it was redeveloped in the early twentieth century as a dominantly lead–zinc producer, making it one of the largest producing lead mines in the world before the Second World War. The geology was first described early in the twentieth century and its nature and origin have been much debated since, but its genesis has remained enigmatic. In this paper we review both published and unpublished reports on work carried out at Bawdwin during the last century, and propose a new geological model based on these reports. Following a more recent classification scheme for volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposits, we assign Bawdwin to the siliciclastic–felsic VMS-type.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMyanmar
Subtitle of host publicationGeology, Resources and Tectonics
EditorsA J BARBER, KHIN ZAW, M J CROW
Place of PublicationLondon UK
PublisherGeological Society of London
Chapter30
Pages669-686
Number of pages18
Volume48
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9781862399693
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameGeological Society Memoir
Number1
Volume48
ISSN (Print)0435-4052

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