The association between fine particulate air pollution and hospital emergency room visits for cardiovascular diseases in Beijing, China

Yuming Guo, Yuping Jia, Xiaochuan Pan, Liqun Liu, H. Erich Wichmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

137 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Because epidemiological studies have yielded different results, the association between exposure to fine particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and acute events of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is unknown. Additionally, no research has been conducted to explore the association between PM2.5 and hospital emergency room (ER) visits of cardiovascular diseases in Beijing, China. Objective: To explore the association between PM2.5 and the hospital ER visits in Beijing, China for CVD {(International Classification of Diseases, 10th vision (ICD-10): I00~I99)}. Methods: We collected data for daily hospital ER visits for CVD from the Peking University Third Hospital, daily ambient PM2.5 data from a fixed monitor site at Peking University, and data on the daily level of gaseous air pollutants {sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)} from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center between June 1, 2004 and December 31, 2006. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to evaluate associations between CVD health outcomes and ambient air pollutants. Results: 8377 hospital ER visits of CVD were collected in our study. After adjusting the temperature and the relative humidity, the associations for 10 μg/m3 increases in levels of PM2.5, SO2, or NO2 and hospital ER visits for cardiovascular diseases were statistically significant with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.005{95% confidence interval (CI): 1.001-1.009}, 1.014(95% CI: 1.004-1.024), and 1.016(95% CI: 1.003-1.029), respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that elevated levels of ambient air pollutants are associated with the increase in hospital ER visits for CVD in Beijing, China.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4826-4830
Number of pages5
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume407
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Aug 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Case-crossover design
  • Fine particulate matter
  • Hospital emergency room visit

Cite this

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title = "The association between fine particulate air pollution and hospital emergency room visits for cardiovascular diseases in Beijing, China",
abstract = "Background: Because epidemiological studies have yielded different results, the association between exposure to fine particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and acute events of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is unknown. Additionally, no research has been conducted to explore the association between PM2.5 and hospital emergency room (ER) visits of cardiovascular diseases in Beijing, China. Objective: To explore the association between PM2.5 and the hospital ER visits in Beijing, China for CVD {(International Classification of Diseases, 10th vision (ICD-10): I00~I99)}. Methods: We collected data for daily hospital ER visits for CVD from the Peking University Third Hospital, daily ambient PM2.5 data from a fixed monitor site at Peking University, and data on the daily level of gaseous air pollutants {sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)} from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center between June 1, 2004 and December 31, 2006. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to evaluate associations between CVD health outcomes and ambient air pollutants. Results: 8377 hospital ER visits of CVD were collected in our study. After adjusting the temperature and the relative humidity, the associations for 10 μg/m3 increases in levels of PM2.5, SO2, or NO2 and hospital ER visits for cardiovascular diseases were statistically significant with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.005{95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.001-1.009}, 1.014(95{\%} CI: 1.004-1.024), and 1.016(95{\%} CI: 1.003-1.029), respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that elevated levels of ambient air pollutants are associated with the increase in hospital ER visits for CVD in Beijing, China.",
keywords = "Air pollution, Cardiovascular disease, Case-crossover design, Fine particulate matter, Hospital emergency room visit",
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The association between fine particulate air pollution and hospital emergency room visits for cardiovascular diseases in Beijing, China. / Guo, Yuming; Jia, Yuping; Pan, Xiaochuan; Liu, Liqun; Wichmann, H. Erich.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 407, No. 17, 15.08.2009, p. 4826-4830.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - The association between fine particulate air pollution and hospital emergency room visits for cardiovascular diseases in Beijing, China

AU - Guo, Yuming

AU - Jia, Yuping

AU - Pan, Xiaochuan

AU - Liu, Liqun

AU - Wichmann, H. Erich

PY - 2009/8/15

Y1 - 2009/8/15

N2 - Background: Because epidemiological studies have yielded different results, the association between exposure to fine particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and acute events of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is unknown. Additionally, no research has been conducted to explore the association between PM2.5 and hospital emergency room (ER) visits of cardiovascular diseases in Beijing, China. Objective: To explore the association between PM2.5 and the hospital ER visits in Beijing, China for CVD {(International Classification of Diseases, 10th vision (ICD-10): I00~I99)}. Methods: We collected data for daily hospital ER visits for CVD from the Peking University Third Hospital, daily ambient PM2.5 data from a fixed monitor site at Peking University, and data on the daily level of gaseous air pollutants {sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)} from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center between June 1, 2004 and December 31, 2006. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to evaluate associations between CVD health outcomes and ambient air pollutants. Results: 8377 hospital ER visits of CVD were collected in our study. After adjusting the temperature and the relative humidity, the associations for 10 μg/m3 increases in levels of PM2.5, SO2, or NO2 and hospital ER visits for cardiovascular diseases were statistically significant with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.005{95% confidence interval (CI): 1.001-1.009}, 1.014(95% CI: 1.004-1.024), and 1.016(95% CI: 1.003-1.029), respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that elevated levels of ambient air pollutants are associated with the increase in hospital ER visits for CVD in Beijing, China.

AB - Background: Because epidemiological studies have yielded different results, the association between exposure to fine particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and acute events of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is unknown. Additionally, no research has been conducted to explore the association between PM2.5 and hospital emergency room (ER) visits of cardiovascular diseases in Beijing, China. Objective: To explore the association between PM2.5 and the hospital ER visits in Beijing, China for CVD {(International Classification of Diseases, 10th vision (ICD-10): I00~I99)}. Methods: We collected data for daily hospital ER visits for CVD from the Peking University Third Hospital, daily ambient PM2.5 data from a fixed monitor site at Peking University, and data on the daily level of gaseous air pollutants {sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)} from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center between June 1, 2004 and December 31, 2006. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to evaluate associations between CVD health outcomes and ambient air pollutants. Results: 8377 hospital ER visits of CVD were collected in our study. After adjusting the temperature and the relative humidity, the associations for 10 μg/m3 increases in levels of PM2.5, SO2, or NO2 and hospital ER visits for cardiovascular diseases were statistically significant with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.005{95% confidence interval (CI): 1.001-1.009}, 1.014(95% CI: 1.004-1.024), and 1.016(95% CI: 1.003-1.029), respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that elevated levels of ambient air pollutants are associated with the increase in hospital ER visits for CVD in Beijing, China.

KW - Air pollution

KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Case-crossover design

KW - Fine particulate matter

KW - Hospital emergency room visit

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